American College of Clinical Pharmacy
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Continuing Pharmacy Education (CPE) Credit

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education (CPE). The 2017 ACCP Annual Meeting will provide up a minimum of 24 contact hours of CPE credit. To receive CPE for Annual Meeting sessions, each attendee must claim the relevant CPE hours at www.accp.com/ce no later than November 30, 2017. Statements of credit will be available at CPE Monitor within 2–3 business days.

To receive BCACP, BCCCP, BCPS or BCPPS recertification credit for a Clinical Reasoning Series offered at the 2017 ACCP Annual Meeting, each attendee must pay a $50 recertification posttest fee and submit a passing score on the posttest no later than December 31, 2017. The posttest will be made available on the “My Account” page of the ACCP website immediately after the ACCP Annual Meeting.

Target Audience
The ACCP Annual Meeting is designed for clinical practitioners, educators, residents, fellows, and pharmacy students engaged in all aspects of clinical pharmacy.

Program Goals
The educational program developed for the 2017 ACCP Annual Meeting will provide attendees with new, high-quality information that is both challenging and applicable to their practice. Program goals are to

  • Update clinical pharmacists on new therapeutic advances and management strategies;
  • Enhance attendees’ clinical, research, teaching, and leadership skills;
  • Discuss the challenges of expanding the scope of pharmacy practice and emerging practice models; and
  • Present opportunities in clinical pharmacy and global health.

ACCP Welcome and Keynote Address: Big Data for Team-Based, Patient-Centered Health Care: A Clinical Framework
October 7, 2017 8:00 AM

Activity No. 0217-0000-17-131-L04-P; 1.00 contact hour.
Knowledge Based Activity

  • Speaker: Summerpal Kahlon, M.D.
    Director, Care Innovation, Oracle Health Sciences, Orlando, Florida
Learning Objectives
1. Describe the emerging world of “big data” and how this relates to the advancement of clinical pharmacy practice;
2. Identify ways to incorporate and utilize robust data sets/information to improve clinical and humanistic outcomes for patients;
3. Summarize the current policy and advocacy issues that intersect with the world of “big data”
Clinical Insights in Anticoagulation Management: Beyond the Guidelines
October 7, 2017 9:45 AM

Activity No. 0217-0000-17-099-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
Knowledge Based Activity

  • Moderator: Kelly M. Rudd, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Anticoagulation, Bassett Healthcare Network – Bassett Medical Center, Cooperstown, New York

One Size Does Not Fit All: Anticoagulation Treatment for Patients Who Fall Outside the Guidelines
  • Speaker: Michael P. Gulseth, Pharm.D., FASHP, BCPS
    Program Director for Anticoagulation Services, Department of Pharmaceutical Services, Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, at the University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine; President, Michael P. Gulseth Anticoagulation Consulting
Learning Objectives
1. Identify patient populations for whom evidence-based anticoagulation guidelines and literature lack clarity, including patients at the extremes of weight, with active cancer, with impaired or variable renal function and the elderly.
2. Evaluate available evidence for anticoagulation treatment in special populations.
3. Use clinical reasoning skills to create a patient-specific treatment plan

Assessment of the (Potentially) Hypercoagulable Patient: When to Test and How Long Do You Treat?
  • Speaker: Daniel M. Witt, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
    Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacotherapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
Learning Objectives
1. Identify when hypercoagulable testing may be beneficial to guide patient care and assist in treatment decisions
2. Review the evidence-based guidelines and literature to guide anticoagulation treatment duration in patients with known hypercoagulable conditions.
3. Use clinical reasoning skills to assimilate anticoagulation recommendations to create a patient-specific treatment plan.

"Ask the Expert" -- A Panel Discussion
  • Speaker: Daniel M. Witt, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
    Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacotherapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Speaker: Michael P. Gulseth, Pharm.D., FASHP, BCPS
    Program Director for Anticoagulation Services, Department of Pharmaceutical Services, Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, at the University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine; President, Michael P. Gulseth Anticoagulation Consulting

Solid Organ Transplantation in HIV- or HCV-Infected Recipients: Controversies in Patient Management
October 7, 2017 9:45 AM

Activity No. 0217-0000-17-132-L02-P; 1.50 contact hours.
Knowledge Based Activity

  • Moderator: Maya Campara, Pharm.D., BCPS
    Clinical Pharmacist, Solid Organ Transplant, University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System, Chicago, Illinois

HIV/HCV-Infected Donors – The New Frontiers in Solid Organ Transplantation
  • Speaker: Lindsey A. Pote, Pharm.D., BCPS
    Liver Transplant Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Solid Organ Transplantation Residency Program Director, John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Learning Objectives
1. Describe the use of HIV/HCV infected donors as a method to alleviate the growing demand for organ donors (HIV Organ Policy Equity (HOPE) Act, various HCV donor protocols).
2. Define the criteria for use of HIV-infected donors in solid organ transplantation and describe efficacy/safety outcomes.
3. Define the criteria for use of HCV-infected donors in solid organ transplantation and describe efficacy/safety outcomes.

Organ Transplantation in HIV-Positive Patients
  • Speaker: Shellee A. Grim, PharmD, MS-CTS, BCPS
    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago; Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Loyola University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
Learning Objectives
1. Describe safety and efficacy outcomes SOT in HIV-infected recipients.
2. Review considerations for management of antiretroviral therapy in transplant patients with HIV.
3. Discuss complications of solid organ transplantation in patients with HIV.

The New Frontier: HCV Treatment and Management Following Organ Transplantation
  • Speaker: Juliana Chan, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCACP

    Clinical Associate Professor and Clinical Pharmacist, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Pharmacy; University of Illinois Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois

Learning Objectives
1. Describe safety and efficacy outcomes SOT in HCV-infected recipients.
2. Discuss HCV management following solid organ transplantation.
3. Describe advantages and disadvantages of HCV treatment options in SOT recipients, including cost and reimbursement issues.

Evaluating Long-term Effects of Newer Diabetes Agents
October 7, 2017 9:45 AM

Activity No. 0217-0000-17-101-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
Knowledge Based Activity

  • Moderator: Erica Crannage, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP
    Associate Professor, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; Clinical Pharmacist, St. Louis University Family and Community Medicine

Evaluating Long-term Effects of SGLT-2 inhibitors
  • Speaker: Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, Pharm.D., BCPS, CDE
    Clinical Associate Professor, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri
Learning Objectives
1. Evaluate the literature on SLGT-2 inhibitors and major adverse CV events (MACEs).
2. Compare CV outcomes for SLGT-2 inhibitors and historical treatments for type 2 diabetes.
3. Identify the ideal candidates for SLGT-2 inhibitor therapy.

Evaluating Long-term Effects of GLP-1 Agonists
  • Speaker: Jennifer D. Goldman, Pharm.D., FCCP, CDE
    Professor of Pharmacy Practice, MCPHS University, Boston, Massachusetts
Learning Objectives
1. Evaluate the literature on GLP-1 agonists and MACEs.
2. Compare CV outcomes for GLP-1 agonists and historical treatments for type 2 diabetes.
3. Identify the ideal candidates for GLP-1 agonist therapy.

Evaluating Long-term Effects of DPP-4 Inhibitors
  • Speaker: Krystal L. Edwards, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCACP
    Associate Dean for Career Development, Office of Professional Affairs; Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Ambulatory Care Division, Texas Tech School of Pharmacy, Dallas, Texas
Learning Objectives
1. Evaluate the literature on DPP-4 inhibitors and MACEs.
2. Compare CV outcomes for DPP-4 inhibitors and historical treatments for type 2 diabetes.
3. Identify the ideal candidates for DPP-4 inhibitors therapy.

Growing Up Is Hard to Do: Transitioning Pediatric Disease State Management to Adult Care
October 7, 2017 9:45 AM

Activity No. 0217-0000-17-102-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
Knowledge Based Activity

  • Moderator: Elizabeth A.S. Goswami, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPPS
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Pediatric Nephrology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland

Transitioning from Pediatric to Adult Care: Guidelines, Barriers, and Opportunities for Pharmacists
  • Speaker: Jill A. Morgan, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPPS
    Pediatric Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland
Learning Objectives
1. Describe guidelines related to transitioning patients from pediatric to adult care.
2. List factors that affect emerging adult’s abilities to transition to the adult care model.
3. Identify opportunities for adult and pediatric pharmacists to improve transitions from the pediatric to adult setting.

In the Next Breath: Pediatric to Adult Transitions in Cystic Fibrosis
  • Speaker: Rebecca S. Pettit, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, BCPPS
    Pediatric Pulmonary Clinical Specialist, Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana
Learning Objectives
1. Describe strategies that are useful in transitioning patients with cystic fibrosis from pediatric to adult care.
2. List factors that affect young adults’ abilities to transition to the adult care model for cystic fibrosis.
3. Identify opportunities for adult and pediatric pharmacists to improve transitions from the pediatric to adult setting.

Seize the Opportunity: Pharmacist Impact on Pediatric to Adult Transitions in Epilepsy
  • Speaker: Mindl Weingarten, Pharm.D., BCPPS
    Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Neurology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
Learning Objectives
1. Describe strategies that are useful in transitioning patients with epilepsy from pediatric to adult care.
2. List factors that affect young adults’ abilities to transition to the adult care model for epilepsy.
3. Identify opportunities for adult and pediatric pharmacists to improve transitions from the pediatric to adult setting.

Credentialing and Privileging: The Key to Advancing Clinical Practice Through Alternate Payment Models
October 7, 2017 9:45 AM

Activity No. 0217-0000-17-191-L04-P; 2.00 contact hours.
Knowledge Based Activity

  • Speaker: John K. McGlew, M.A.
    Director, Government Affairs, American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP), Washington, D.C.
  • Speaker: Daniel S. Aistrope, Pharm.D., BCACP
    Director, Clinical Practice Advancement, American College of Clinical Pharmacy, Lenexa, Kansas
  • Speaker: Allyson Schlichte, Pharm.D., MBA, BCACP
    Medication Therapy Management Operations Lead and Provider, Fairview Health Services, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Learning Objectives
1. Describe the policy principles of ACCP’s Medicare Initiative to establish coverage for comprehensive medication management (CMM) services within the Medicare program.
2. Identify the key challenges and opportunities in Congress and within the administrative agencies in establishing Medicare coverage for CMM.
3. Describe the key goals of the MACRA legislation as they relate to value-based payment structures and identify opportunities within this implementation process to advance clinical pharmacy practice and expand access to CMM services.
4. Explain why credentialing and privileging are essential to the ongoing effort to fully integrate clinical pharmacists into health care teams under evolving alternate payment models.
Scientific Poster Presentation Session I: Infectious Diseases
October 7, 2017 12:00 PM

Activity No. 0217-0000-17-201-L04-P; 0.50 contact hours.
Knowledge Based Activity

    Learning Objectives
    1. Discuss current and relevant infectious disease research.
    2. Describe four infectious disease research studies important to clinical pharmacy.

    The Impact of Variation Among Hepatitis C Prior Authorization Policies in the Oregon Medicaid Program on Utilization of Direct-Acting Antivirals
    • Speaker: Megan Herink, Pharm.D., BCPS
      Assistant Professor, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon

    Hepatitis C Prior Authorization: Prudent Cost Saving Measure or Inconsistencies with Fibrosis Score Criteria?
    • Speaker: Ellyn Polley, B.S., Pharm.D. Candidate 2018
      Student, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    Implementation and Evaluation of a Collaborative Community Pharmacy-based Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Screening Program with Linkage to Care
    • Speaker: Michael E. Klepser, Pharm.D., FCCP
      Professor of Pharmacy, Ferris State University, Kalamazoo, Michigan

    The Evolution of Pharmacist Authorship Among Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines
    • Speaker: Lauren K. Freeman
      Student, SCCP-USC, Goose Creek, South Carolina

    Impact of an Antifungal Stewardship Intervention on Optimization of Candidemia Management
    • Speaker: Kayla R. Stover, Pharm.D.
      Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Jackson, Mississippi

    Evaluation of Antibiotic De-escalation on Internal Medicine Services at an Academic Medical Center with Rounding Pharmacists Compared to Services Without Rounding Pharmacists
    • Speaker: Bethany A. Miller, Pharm.D
      Resident, Carilion Clinic, Morgantown, West Virginia

    Scientific Poster Presentation Session I: Anticoagulation
    October 7, 2017 12:30 PM

    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-200-L01-P; 0.50 contact hours.
    Knowledge Based Activity

      Learning Objectives
      1. Discuss current and relevant anticoagulation/hematology research.
      2. Describe four anticoagulation/hematology research studies important to clinical pharmacy.

      Safety of Apixaban Versus Warfarin in Severe Kidney Disease
      • Speaker: Britta A. Staubes, Pharm.D., BCPS
        Clinical Pharmacy Specialist-Internal Medicine at Ochsner Health System Ochsner Health System, Mercer University, New Orleans, Louisana

      The Effect of Obesity on the Rate and Detection of Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia
      • Speaker: Carrie S. Oliphant, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS (AQ Cardiology)
        Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Cardiology/Anticoagulation, Methodist University Hospital; Associate Professor, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, Tennessee

      Evaluation of Inpatient Dosing Requirements in Obese Patients Newly Initiated on Warfarin
      • Speaker: Katie B. Tellor, Pharm.D., BCPS
        Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, Missouri

      Evaluation of Appropriateness of Direct Oral Anticoagulant Dosing for Discharge Prescriptions
      • Speaker: Laura Lemens, Pharm.D.
        PGY2 Internal Medicine Pharmacy Resident at Wake Forest Baptist Health, Wake Forest Baptist Health, Drake University, Winston Salem, North Carolina

      Management of Bleeding Complications in Patients on Oral Anticoagulants: A National Survey of Pharmacists
      • Speaker: Kayla M. Torppey, PharmD, BCPS
        Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center,Lyndhurst, New Jersey

      Scientific Writing Workshop
      October 7, 2017 1:00 PM

      Activity No. 0217-0000-17-195-L04-P; 3.50 contact hours.
      Knowledge Based Activity

        Get the Most of Your 300 Words: Enhancing Abstract Submissions
        • Speaker: Jeffrey F. Barletta, Pharm.D., FCCM
          Professor and Vice Chair of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy, Glendale, Arizona
        Learning Objectives
        1. Define the components of a good research question.
        2. Differentiate and develop the different sections of an abstract submission.
        3. Identify weakness within abstract submissions and methods for improvement.

        Scientific Writing: Starting with the End in Mind
        • Speaker: John E. Murphy, Pharm.D., FCCP, FASHP
          Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Science and Associate Dean - Phoenix Campus, University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
        Learning Objectives
        1. Evaluate approaches to outline development for a scientific paper.
        2. Determine appropriate placement for information in results, discussion, and conclusions.
        3. Develop criteria to evaluate journals as targets for submission of a scientific paper.
        4. Identify rating/ranking systems used for journals and individuals.

        Scientific Writing: Titles, Abstracts, and Introductions
        • Speaker: Marc E. Tischler, Ph.D.
          Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona
        Learning Objectives
        1. Identify the key aspects of preparing a meaningful title for a scientific manuscript.
        2. Summarize the key elements of a well-prepared abstract for a scientific manuscript.
        3. Summarize the key elements of preparing a well-written introduction to a scientific manuscript.
        4. List the primary rules and word usage for good scientific writing.
        5. Identify the sections of a manuscript in which active voice is preferred and in what section passive voice is a necessity.

        Critical Care PRN Focus Session -- Guidance on the Guidelines: Hospital-Associated and Ventilator-Acquired Pneumonia, Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis, and Sepsis
        October 7, 2017 1:45 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-133-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Drayton A. Hammond, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, BCCCP
          Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Medical and Cardiac Intensive Care, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois

        A Breath of Fresh Air: Best Practices in Hospital-Associated and Ventilator-Acquired Pneumonia
        • Speaker: Joseph M. Swanson, Pharm.D., FCCM, BCPS
          Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, Tennessee
        Learning Objectives
        1. Identify key changes in the management of HAP and VAP with the updated 2016 guidelines.
        2. Discuss risk stratification for empiric MRSA vs MSSA coverage and double coverage for Pseudomonas species.
        3. Explain appropriate incorporation of the new guidelines into standard antimicrobial order sets.

        Resolving Controversies in the Prevention of Stress-Related Mucosal Bleeding
        • Speaker: Robert MacLaren, Pharm.D., FCCP, FCCM
          Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aurora, Colorado
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the updates in the 2017 stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) guidelines.
        2. Evaluate the safety and efficacy data between histamine receptor-2 antagonists and proton pump inhibitors for SUP.
        3. Discuss strategies to implement the new SUP guidelines in clinical practice.

        Sepsis and Septic Shock Recognition and Management in 2017: Incorporating the Guidelines into Practice
        • Speaker: Scott Micek, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
          Clinical Pharmacist, Critical Care; Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the changes to the diagnosis and early, directed therapy as outlined within the new 2017 sepsis guidelines.
        2. Integrate the new guidelines into daily practice with a focus on sepsis as a new core measure.

        Hematology/Oncology PRN Focus Session -- Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy-Induced Endocrinopathies
        October 7, 2017 1:45 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-134-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Marco Martino, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, BCOP
          Operations Team Lead (Hematology/Oncology), Northwestern Medicine, Chicago, Illinois

        Chemotherapy-Induced Endocrinopathies
        • Speaker: LeAnn B. Norris, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCOP
          Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina
        Learning Objectives
        1. List the chemotherapeutic agents that can cause endocrine toxicities.
        2. Describe the subjective and objective presentation of chemotherapy-induced endocrine toxicities.
        3. Discuss the appropriate treatment of chemotherapy-induced endocrine toxicities.

        Immunotherapy-Induced Endocrinopathies
        • Speaker: Patrick J. Medina, Pharm.D., BCOP
          Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma, College of Pharmacy, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
        Learning Objectives
        1. Identify and describe immunotherapy agents utilized for the treatment of cancer.
        2. Identify toxicities and side effects of immunotherapy agents utilized for the treatment of cancer.
        3. Explain how to manage side effects of these immunotherapy agents utilized for the treatment of cancer.

        Central Nervous System PRN Focus Session -- Challenges in Using Antiseizure Medications During Pregnancy
        October 7, 2017 1:45 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-135-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Jeannine M. Conway, Pharm.D., BCPS

        Antiseizure Medications: What Do We Know About the Teratogenic Risk?
        • Speaker: Collin A. Hovinga, Pharm.D., M.S.
          Director of Research PSS, Dell Children's Medical Center, Austin, Texas; Clinical Associate Professor, University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy
        Learning Objectives
        1. Discuss the risks of antiseizure medications on the fetus during pregnancy through early childhood development.
        2. Analyze risk vs benefits of antiseizure medication treatment in pregnancy through clinical decision making
        3. Compare and contrast drug selection and dosing strategies for antiseizure medications

        Pharmacokinetic Changes During and Post-Pregnancy
        • Speaker: Angela Birnbaum, Ph.D.
          Professor, Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
        Learning Objectives
        1. Identify antiseizure medication pharmacokinetic changes that occur during pregnancy and postpartum
        2. Describe how the pharmacokinetic changes may impact tolerability and efficacy of antiseizure. Medications.
        3. Apply evidence based medicine in developing a plan for managing antiseizure medications.

        Optimization of Antiseizure Medications: The Role of the Pharmacist
        • Speaker: Jacquelyn L. Bainbridge, Pharm.D., FCCP
          Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Department of Neurology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aurora, Colorado
        Learning Objectives
        1. Identify barriers to medication adherence during pregnancy and the postpartum periods.
        2. Discuss the role of the pharmacist in optimizing medication use pre, during, and post pregnancy.
        3. Identify practice settings in which pharmacists can engage in collaborative practice for antiseizure medication management for pre-pregnancy counseling, pregnant and postpartum patients.

        Immunology/Transplantation PRN Focus Session -- Antibody-Mediated Rejection: Are We Really Making Progress? – A Spirited Debate
        October 7, 2017 1:45 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-136-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Amanda J. Condon, Pharm.D.

        Novel End Points for Measuring the Effectiveness of Antibody-Mediated Rejection
        • Speaker: Matthew J. Everly, Pharm.D., BCPS
          Director, Terasaki Research Institute, Los Angeles and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Medicine, Nephrology Division, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California
        Learning Objectives
        1. Define AMR in various solid organ transplant populations.
        2. Discuss the limitations of current clinical endpoints for AMR.
        3. Analyze the literature behind novel clinical endpoints for AMR treatment.
        4. Describe early phase investigational treatments for AMR.

        Antibody-Mediated Rejection: Yes, Novel Agents Are Worthy of Use -- Pro Point and Rebuttal
        • Speaker: Christopher R. Ensor, Pharm.D., BCPS
          Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Medicine; Medical Director of Lung Transplant Outcomes Research Program, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe current and novel agents and treatment regimens for AMR.
        2. Compare the costs, effectiveness, and risk associated with each agent/regimen used in AMR treatment based upon the point-counterpoint debate.
        3. Design a treatment regimen, using the specifics of your institution, transplant population, and ability to take risk based upon the point-counterpoint debate.

        Antibody-Mediated Rejection: No, the Risks and Costs of Novel Agents Outweigh Their Benefit -- Con Counterpoint and Rebuttal
        • Speaker: Lisa Potter, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
          Clinical Coordinator, Transplant Pharmacy Services, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois

        AMR Expert Panel Discussion
        • Speaker: Steven Gabardi, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
          Abdominal Organ Transplant Specialist, Program Director, PGY2 Organ Transplant Pharmacology Residency, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Transplant Surgery/Renal Division; Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
        Learning Objectives
        1. Review key AMR debate points.
        2. Justify costs associated with AMR consequences and therapeutics.
        3. Describe future direction of AMR therapies.

        Leadership Primer, I
        October 7, 2017 1:45 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-16-156-L04-P; 4.00 contact hours.
        Application Based Activity

        • Faculty: Robert S. Beardsley, Ph.D.
          Professor and Vice Chair for Administration, Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland
        • Faculty: Peter Hurd, Ph.D.
          Professor and Department Chair, Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, Missouri
        • Faculty: Robert E. Smith, Pharm.D.
          Professor Emeritus, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the differences between leadership and management.
        2. Apply concepts and theories from organizational behavior literature to pharmacy settings.
        3. Apply situational leadership concepts to pharmacy situations.
        4. Evaluate motivations and stages of change in pharmacy settings.
        5. Define leadership in terms used by Gardner and Burns.
        6. Describe the various attributes of leadership.
        7. Apply Blake and Mouton's work on motivation to your own practice setting.
        8. Describe motivation based on the work of Maslow.
        9. Differentiate between motivators and hygiene factors as defined by Herzberg.
        10. Describe the various components of the Transtheoretical Model as it relates to pharmacy management.
        11. Apply the principles within the Transtheoretical Model to your own practice setting.
        Research Primer
        October 7, 2017 1:45 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-15-153-L04-P; 4.00 contact hours.
        Application Based Activity

        • Faculty: Gary L. Cochran, Pharm.D., S.M.
          Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Pharmacy, Omaha, Nebraska
        • Faculty: Jimmi Hatton Kolpek, Pharm.D., FCCP, FCCM, FNAP
          Professor of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
        • Faculty: Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., M.S.
          Assistant Professor, Educational Innovation and Research; Director, Office of Strategic Planning and Assessment, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
        • Faculty: Mary T. Roth McClurg, Pharm.D., MHS, FCCP
          Associate Professor, Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education; Associate Director for Academic Innovation, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the regulatory definitions of research, quality improvement, and expectations for IRB reviews.
        2. Describe the steps in developing a study protocol for the research project.
        3. Practice the iterative process of creating a defined and focused research question using PICO and FINER criteria.
        4. Utilize publications to identify research questions, study designs, and methodologies.
        5. Identify resources needed to conduct the research project and answer the research question.
        6. Describe “best practices” for establishing and maintaining optimal relationships with your research mentor.
        Teaching and Learning Primer
        October 7, 2017 1:45 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-16-157-L04-P; 4.00 contact hours.
        Application Based Activity

        • Faculty: Daniel S. Longyhore, Pharm.D., M.S., BCACP
          Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; Ambulatory Care Pharmacist, St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
        • Faculty: Pamela L. Stamm, Pharm.D., FASHP, BCPS, BCACP, CDE
          Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
        • Faculty: Thomas D. Zlatic, Ph.D.
          Professor, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, Missouri
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe basic concepts related to current pedagogical theory and practice as they pertain to pharmacy education and practice.
        2. Develop basic strategies for planning, implementing, and assessing educational experiences structured to achieve clearly defined student outcomes within didactic and clinical settings.
        3. Clarify one’s own purposes, goals, and philosophy for teaching, and identify strategies for continued self-learning and development.
        Scaling and Sustaining CMM: Findings to Date from the CMM in Primary Care Study
        October 7, 2017 1:45 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-206-L04-P; 2.00 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Speaker: Todd D. Sorensen, Pharm.D., FAPhA, FCCP
          Professor and Associate Department Head, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
        • Speaker: Mary T. Roth McClurg, Pharm.D., MHS, FCCP
          Associate Professor, Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education; Associate Director for Academic Innovation, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
        • Speaker: Deborah Pestka, Pharm.D.
          Ph.D. Candidate, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe how implementation science frameworks have influenced the study’s definitional work on the foundational elements of CMM practice – philosophy of practice, patient care process and practice management components.
        2. Recognize the experience to-date of study sites who have engaged in defined practice implementation strategies and the relevance of this experience to scaling CMM nationally.
        3. Identify study activities in-progress that are key to evaluating the impact of CMM across the dimensions of clinical outcomes, health care resource utilization, and cost as well as patient and physician experience.
        4. Describe how the scope of study activities are converging to establish a multifaceted implementation system that will enable efforts to scale and sustain CMM nationally.
        Ambulatory Care PRN Focus Session -- Breaking Out of the Big 3: Using Innovative Strategies to Expand Ambulatory Care Pharmacist Services Beyond HTN, DM, and Lipids
        October 7, 2017 3:30 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-137-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Kelly A. Cochran, Pharm.D., BCPS
          Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice & Administration, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Pharmacy, Columbia, Missouri

        Utilization of Population Health Technology and Relevant Measures to Identify Patient Care Opportunities/Needs to Justify Expansion of Services Beyond the Big 3 (HTN/DM/Lipids)
        • Speaker: Sean M. Jeffery, Pharm.D., FASCP, FNAP, CGP, AGSF
          University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Storrs, Connecticut
        Learning Objectives
        1. Define population health and describe population health management concepts.
        2. Identify relevant population health quality metrics for disease states beyond the Big 3 (HTN, DM, Lipids).
        3. Summarize how pharmacists can use population health tools to drive patient care services and interventions.

        Successful Practice Highlight: Innovative Strategies to Expand Beyond the Big 3 (HTN, DM, Lipids)
        • Speaker: Holly E. Gurgle, Pharm.D., BCACP
          University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City, Utah
        • Speaker: Amber D. Cizmic, Pharm.D., BCACP
          Lowry Family Health Center, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the clinical impact of using population health quality metrics for disease states beyond the Big 3 on ambulatory care practice sites.
        2. Identify effective tools/tips and unique care delivery models to provide care beyond the Big 3.
        3. Discuss strategies for interprofessional collaborations and overcoming challenges for expanding services beyond the Big 3.

        Emergency Medicine PRN Focus Session -- Code Breakpoint: A Guide to Combat Stress and Burnout in the Acute Care Pharmacist
        October 7, 2017 3:30 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-138-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Application Based Activity

        • Moderator: Nadia I. Awad, Pharm.D., BCPS
          Emergency Medicine Pharmacist, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey

        The Ins and Outs of Stress and Burnout in the Acute Care Setting
        • Speaker: Renee Petzel Gimbar
          Clinical Pharmacist, Emergency Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
        Learning Objectives
        1. Identify areas of vulnerability that lead to stress and burnout in the academic and clinical career of the healthcare professional in the acute care setting.
        2. Appraise the literature surrounding stress and burnout among academic and healthcare professionals in the acute care setting.
        3. Apply methods for identification of sources of stress and burnout among academic and clinical pharmacists in the acute care setting.

        Promotion of Wellness in Learners and New Practitioners: Being a Healthy Role Model
        • Speaker: Frank P. Paloucek, Pharm.D., DABAT, FASHP
          Clinical Professor and Director, PGY1 Pharmacy Residency Program, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, Chicago, Illinois
        Learning Objectives
        1. Evaluate literature related to stress and burnout among trainees and new practitioners in the acute care setting.
        2. Discuss the impact of stress and burnout of acute care practitioners on trainees and new practitioners in the acute care setting.
        3. Identify methods for fostering wellness in trainees and new practitioners in the acute care setting.

        Strategies to Mitigate Stress and Burnout Among Health Care Professionals in the Acute Care Setting
        • Speaker: Ashley Liebig, RN, CCRN
          Travis County STAR Flight, Austin, Texas
        Learning Objectives
        1. Discuss methods to create a positive work environment among healthcare practitioners in the acute care setting.
        2. Identify practical techniques to foster physical health and wellness among healthcare practitioners in the acute care setting.
        3. Describe strategies in handling work-related and emotional stress related to high acuity situations in the healthcare setting.

        Perioperative Care PRN Focus Session -- Enhanced Recovery: The Paradigm Shift in Perioperative Care
        October 7, 2017 3:30 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-139-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Richard H. Parrish, II, Ph.D., FCCP, BCPS
          Chief Pharmacist and Director, Pharmacy Services, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

        Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Programs – Theory and Implementation from a Pharmacist’s Perspective
        • Speaker: Jenna K. Lovely, Pharm.D.
          Medication Management Informaticist, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the scientific and clinical evidence for the development of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs.
        2. Specify the key elements needed for successful multidisciplinary implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs.
        3. Identify opportunities and challenges encountered when designing collaborative practice agreements in the perioperative care setting.

        Teaming Up for ERAS -- Examples from Bariatric and Colonic Subspecialties
        • Speaker: April N. Smith, Pharm.D., BCPS
          Associate Professor, Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Omaha, Nebraska
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the rationale and intended outcomes of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program in bariatric surgery.
        2. Specify key elements and team players needed for successful multidisciplinary implementation of an ERAS program in bariatric surgery.
        3. Identify opportunities and challenges encountered when designing an ERAS protocol for bariatric surgery.

        Blending Medication Management and Clinical Practice in the OR Suite and at the Bedside
        • Speaker: Sara Jordan, Pharm.D., BCPS
          Clinical Pharmacist, Grant Medical Center, OhioHealth, Columbus, Ohio
        Learning Objectives
        1. Explore potential areas of expansion of clinical pharmacy services in pre-, intra-, and post-operative phases to improve surgical outcomes.
        2. Evaluate evidence-based pharmacotherapy interventions leading to measurable outcomes in the intra- and post-operative settings.

        New Investigator Award/Lecture -- The View from an AHRQ Evidence-Based Practice Center
        October 8, 2017 8:25 AM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-216-L04-P; 0.25 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Speaker: Diana M. Sobieraj, Pharm.D.
          Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Hartford, Connecticut
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the UConn EPC program structure and function.
        2. Explain the execution of a systematic review under the EPC program and lessons learned.
        Therapeutic Frontiers Lecture -- The Evolution of Precision Medicine in HIV Infection
        October 8, 2017 10:20 AM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-215-L02-P; 0.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Speaker: Angela D.M. Kashuba, Pharm.D., DABCP
          John A. and Deborah S. McNeill Jr. Distinguished Professor, Chair, Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, Eshelman School of Pharmacy; Director, Clinical Pharmacology and Analytical Chemistry Core, UNC Center for AIDS Research; Adjunct Professor of Medicine, UNC School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the limitations of antiretroviral therapy for HIV treatment.
        2. Identify the challenges of drug development in HIV prevention.
        3. Differentiate between viral reservoirs and explain new pharmacologic approaches to target them.
        Leadership Primer, II
        October 8, 2017 2:15 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-14-139-L04-P; 2.00 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Faculty: Peter Hurd, Ph.D.
          Professor and Department Chair, Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, Missouri
        • Faculty: Robert E. Smith, Pharm.D.
          Professor Emeritus, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the components of becoming a leader (Warren Bennis).
        2. Apply concepts and theories from the leadership literature to pharmacy settings.
        3. Describe the various attributes of leadership development.
        4. Apply concepts and theories from organizational behavior literature to pharmacy settings.
        5. Evaluate the use of principle-centered power in the pharmacy environment.
        Endocrine and Metabolism PRN Focus Session -- Cardiovascular Outcomes Trials in Antidiabetic Agents, and Other Clinical Pearls on All Things E&M
        October 8, 2017 2:15 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-140-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Christie A. Schumacher, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP
          Associate Professor, Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy, Chicago, Illinois

        Getting to the Heart of It: An Overview of Cardiovascular Outcomes Trials in Antidiabetic Agents
        • Speaker: Laura Shane-McWhorter, Pharm.D., FASCP, BCPS
          Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapy, University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City, Utah
        Learning Objectives
        1. Describe the rationale and historical significance behind the cardiovascular outcomes trials for antidiabetic agents.
        2. Evaluate the results and implications of the cardiovascular outcomes trials and apply to clinical practice.
        3. Discuss the limitations of each of the cardiovascular outcomes trials.

        An Endocrinology Refresher: E&M Clinical Pearls
        • Speaker: Sarah L. Anderson, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP
          Associate Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aurora, Colorado
        • Speaker: Diana Isaacs, Pharm.D., BCPS
          Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute, Diabetes Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio
        • Speaker: Brian K. Irons, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCACP,
          Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Division Head-Ambulatory Care, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas
        • Speaker: Jill S. Borchert, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCACP
          Professor and Vice Chair, Pharmacy Practice; Director, PGY2 Ambulatory Care Residency Program, Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy, Chicago, Illinois
        • Speaker: Jennifer N. Clements, Pharm.D., BCPS, CDE
          Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice; Coordinator, Postgraduate Education, Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy, Clinton, South Carolina
        Learning Objectives
        1. Assess the potential advantages and disadvantages of the different therapeutic options for obesity.
        2. Summarize new updates in the management of hypothyroidism.
        3. Evaluate the evidence and current approaches to the management of osteoporosis.
        4. Discuss the use of GLP-1 receptor agonists with basal/bolus insulin regimens.
        5. Explain the role of new technology in the management of type 1 diabetes patients.

        HIV PRN and Women's Health PRN Focus Session -- HIV and Gender: Implications for Prevention and Care
        October 8, 2017 2:15 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-141-L02-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Kimberly Scarsi, Pharm.D., M.Sc.
          Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Pharmacy, Omaha, Nebraska

        An Ounce of PrEP-vention: Preventing HIV in Women
        • Speaker: Mackenzie L. Cottrell, Pharm.D.
          Research Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
        Learning Objectives
        1. Recognize gender disparities in the uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).
        2. Describe novel PrEP strategies for women.
        3. Compare and contrast HIV prevention strategies in men versus women.

        My Preferred Pronoun Is … Optimizing Care for Transgender Women
        • Speaker: Joshua Havens, Pharm.D.
          Specialty Care Clinic, Nebraska Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska
        Learning Objectives
        1. Recommend common medication therapies for gender affirming therapy.
        2. Interpret goals of therapy and monitoring parameters for hormonal pharmacotherapy.
        3. Describe possible drug-drug interactions between gender affirming therapy and antiretrovirals used for HIV treatment or prevention.

        The Changing Tide: Considerations Throughout the Life Span of Women Living with HIV
        • Speaker: Jennifer Cocohoba, Pharm.D.
          Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California
        Learning Objectives
        1. Compare and contrast the clinical outcomes and unique risks of antiretroviral pharmacotherapy in women versus men.
        2. Manage drug-drug interactions between hormone replacement therapy or contraceptives and antiretrovirals.
        3. Choose an optimal antiretroviral therapy regimen for an HIV-infected pregnant woman.

        Global Health PRN Focus Session -- Turning the Tide of Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) in Developing Countries
        October 8, 2017 2:15 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-142-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Harleen Singh, Pharm.D.
          Associate Professor, Oregon State University, Portland, Oregon

        Noncommunicable Diseases: Global Trends and Initiatives
        • Speaker: Sonak Pastakia, Pharm.D., MPH, BCPS
          Associate Professor, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, Indiana; Jefferson Science Fellow, USAID Africa Health Bureau for Sustainable Development, Washington, D.C.; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, Indiana; Visiting Lecturer, Moi University School of Medicine, Eldoret, Kenya
        Learning Objectives
        1. Recognize global trends in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and the impact of biological, behavioral, and social determinants
        2. Examine current regional and global initiatives for preventing and controlling NCDs in low and middle income countries (LMICs)
        3. Describe funding opportunities for sustainable treatment of NCDs in resource-constrained settings

        The Promise and Pitfalls of Technology in Addressing Noncommunicable Diseases in Developing Countries
        • Speaker: David R. Steeb, Pharm.D.
          Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Global Engagement, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
        Learning Objectives
        1. Recognize the impact of technology to improve health care delivery in low and middle income countries (LMICs).
        2. Explain the mobile health and point-of-care (POC) testing currently being utilized to address non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in resource-constrained regions.
        3. Evaluate challenges and future advances of these technologies to address NCDs.

        PK/PD/PG PRN Focus Session -- Personalizing Your Practice: A Practical Guide to Implementing Pharmacogenetics at Your Institution
        October 8, 2017 2:15 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-143-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
        Knowledge Based Activity

        • Moderator: Roseann S. Gammal, Pharm.D., BCPS
          Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, MCPHS University, Boston, Massachusetts

        A Step-by-Step Guide to Implementing Pharmacogenetics into Clinical Practice
        • Speaker: Henry Dunnenberger, IV, Pharm.D.
          Director - Pharmacogenomics, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois
        Learning Objectives
        1. Review foundational pharmacogenetics concepts and terminology.
        2. Identify the key steps required for the successful implementation of pharmacogenetics in clinical practice.
        3. Describe the development of a pharmacist-led clinical pharmacogenetics practice.

        Common Challenges to Implementing Pharmacogenetic Services and Strategies to Overcome Them
        • Speaker: Gillian Bell, Pharm.D.
          Personalized Medicine Program, Mission Health, Asheville, North Carolina
        Learning Objectives
        1. Review the diverse practice models for the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics.
        2. identify common challenges to implementing pharmacogenetic testing in clinical practice.
        3. Describe strategies to overcome pharmacogenetics implementation challenges.

        Perspectives on the Implementation of Clinical Pharmacogenetics: Expert Panel Discussion
        • Speaker: Kristin W. Weitzel, Pharm.D., FAPhA, CDE
          Clinical Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapy & Translational Research, University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Gainesville, Florida
        • Speaker: Philip E. Empey, Pharm.D., Ph.D., BCPS
          Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy; Associate Director for Pharmacogenomics, Institute for Precision Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
        • Speaker: Kristine R. Crews, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
          Translational Research Laboratory Director, Pharmaceutical Sciences Department, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee
        Learning Objectives
        1. Compare and contrast the diverse approaches to implmening pharmacogenetics into inpatient and outpatient clinical practices.
        2. Discuss strategies to initiate pharmacogenetic testing at your institution.
        3. Identify solutions to pharmacogenetics implementation challenges at your institution.

        Beyond the Cancer: Diabetes, and Cardiomyopathy
        October 8, 2017 2:15 PM

        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-197-L01-P; 1.00 contact hour.
        Knowledge Based Activity

          Learning Objectives
          1. Explain BDNF genetic polymorphism and its role in chemotherapy-associated cognitive impairment (CACI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer.
          2. Discuss the significance of CACI in patients with early-stage breast cancer.
          3. List 3 pleiotropic effects of statins.
          4. Describe the differences between pravastatin and simvastatin in regard to cancer-related effects.
          5. Discuss the incidence and prevalence of doxorubicin-associated cardiomyopathy.
          6. Explain the current role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in the treatment of doxorubicin-associated cardiomyopathy.

          Pravastatin in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Solid Tumors -- Are All Statins Created Equal?
          • Speaker: Anna Slavinsky, Pharm. D
            Pharmacist, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York

          Candesartan as a Potential Protective Agent Against Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy in Rats
          • Speaker: Nancy Safwat Younis, PhD
            Assistant Professor, King Faisal University, Al Ahsa, Saudi Arabia

          Addressing the Opioid Epidemic: Safe and Effective Pain Management and Treatment of Addiction in Patients with an Opioid Use Disorder
          October 8, 2017 2:15 PM

          Activity No. 0217-0000-17-104-L01-P; 3.75 contact hours.
          Application Based Activity

          • Moderator: Suzanne A. Nesbit, Pharm.D., BCPS, CPE
            Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Pain and Palliative Care, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
          • Moderator: Stephanie D. Nichols, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPP
            Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Substance Use Disorders, School of Pharmacy, Husson University, Bangor, Maine

          Neurobiology of Addiction, Empathy, and Stigma
          • Speaker: Jeffrey Fudin, Pharm.D., DAAPM, FCCP, FASHP
            Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Stratton VA Medical Center, Albany, New York
          Learning Objectives
          1. Summarize the neurobiology of addiction.
          2. Compare opioid addiction to other diseases impacted by personal behavior (examples: diabetes, skin cancer, lung cancer).
          3. Explain the rationale from an individual and public health perspective to avoid and reduce stigma around opioid addiction.
          4. Analyze and apply strategies to reduce stigma in your practice setting (ex. language, empathy, reframing understanding)

          Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) for Opioid Use Disorder (OUD)
          • Speaker: J. Paul Martin, M.D.
            Medical Director, Neil Dobbins Detoxification and Crisis Stabilization Unit, Asheville, North Carolina
          Learning Objectives
          1. Evaluate the efficacy and safety of methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone in opioid addiction.
          2. Given a patient case, synthesize a monitoring plan for use of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT).
          3. Given a patient case, compare and contrast options to treat severe, acute pain in a patient on methadone, buprenorphine, and/or naltrexone.
          4. Given a patient case, evaluate barriers to access MAT and challenges of treatment.

          Break

          Pain Management Strategies in Patients with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD)
          • Speaker: Lee A. Kral, Pharm.D., BCPS
            Pain Management Clinical Pharmacy Specialist and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Anesthesia, Center for Pain Medicine, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa
          Learning Objectives
          1. Construct optimal opioid tapering plans that minimize conversion to or exacerbation of illicit opioid use.
          2. Compare and contrast multi-modal, adjunctive and alternative treatments to opioid therapy in patients with an OUD.
          3. Identify the impact of methadone and buprenorphine on acute pain management.
          4. Describe the concepts of tolerance and hyperalgesia.
          5. Detail management strategies to treat moderate to severe, acute pain (ex. post-operative) in a patient with an Opioid Use Disorder.

          Increasing Pharmacist Community Engagement and Advocacy
          • Speaker: Christopher Jones, Pharm.D., MPH. LCDR
            Acting Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary (Science and Data Policy), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), US Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.
          Learning Objectives
          1. Detail the state Prescription Monitoring Programs and their utility and limitations in patient care.
          2. Describe the components of successful implementation of overdose education and naloxone distribution.
          3. Demonstrate strategies to engage in legislative advocacy efforts.
          4. Explain opportunities for pharmacist community education around prevention of opioid use disorders (ex. reach out to local schools, drug take backs, reducing stigma, non-judgmental sales of clean needles, etc).

          Increasing Pharmacist Community Engagement and Advocacy -- A Panel Discussion

          Adult Medicine PRN Focus Session -- Feeling the Burn of Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy: When Do the Risks Outweigh the Benefits?
          October 8, 2017 4:00 PM

          Activity No. 0217-0000-17-145-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
          Knowledge Based Activity

          • Moderator: Leigh Anne H. Gravatt, Pharm.D.

          The Rise of Proton Pump Inhibitors: How Did We Get Here?
          • Speaker: Lindsay M. Saum, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP
            Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University
          Learning Objectives
          1. Examine the timeline of the rise of proton pump inhibitor use.
          2. Identify the factors associated with overprescribing proton pump inhibitors.

          Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI) Therapy for a Defined Course Has Minimal Risks (Pro)
          • Speaker: Lindsay M. Saum, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP
            Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University
          Learning Objectives
          1. Discuss the appropriate indications and length of therapy for proton pump inhibitor therapy.
          2. Describe the risk associated with short-term proton pump inhibitor therapy.
          3. Select appropriate scenarios where the use of proton pump inhibitors would be warranted.

          The Risks of Proton Pump Inhibitors Outweigh the Short-term Benefits (Con)
          • Speaker: Carolyn C. Brackett, Pharm.D., BCPS
            Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, Ohio State University, College of Pharmacy, Department of Family Medicine, Columbus, Ohio; Director of Pharmaceutical Education, St. Ann's Family Medicine Residency Program, Westerville, Ohio
          Learning Objectives
          1. Identify specific adverse effects tied to proton pump inhibitors and determine if the literature validates these concerns.
          2. Analyze the available literature regarding complications of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy including the risk of dementia, kidney disease, infectious diseases and cardiovascular disease.

          PPI Debate: Rebuttal (Pro and Con)
          Learning Objectives
          1. Select appropriate scenarios where the use of proton pump inhibitors would be warranted.
          2. Apply knowledge of specific adverse events linked to proton pump inhibitor into an appropriate treatment decision.

          Feeling the Burn: How to Ensure Appropriate PPI Use
          • Speaker: Gregory J. Hughes, Pharm.D.
            Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Clinical Health Professions, St. John's University, Queens, New York
          Learning Objectives
          1. Assess the literature for methods proven to ensure appropriate PPI therapy
          2. Propose an algorithm for appropriate proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy.
          3. Develop treatment strategies to ensure appropriate use of PPIs in both the inpatient and outpatient settings.

          Clinical Administration PRN Focus Session -- High-Cost Drugs: How Did We Get Here and Where Do We Go Now
          October 8, 2017 4:00 PM

          Activity No. 0217-0000-17-146-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
          Application Based Activity

          • Moderator: Venita Papillion, Pharm.D., MBA

          The High Cost of Prescription Drugs: Causes and Solutions
          • Speaker: Lee C. Vermeulen, Jr., M.S., FCCP, FFIP
            Professor of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Kentucky; Chief, Academic Service Lines, UK HealthCare, Lexington, Kentucky
          Learning Objectives
          1. Describe factors that have contributed to the increase in cost of pharmaceuticals and the role of manufacturer’s to set drug pricing.
          2. Identify opportunities and best practices for cost mitigation.

          Management of High-Cost Drugs in the Acute Setting
          • Speaker: Karen J. McConnell, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS (AQ Cardiology)
            System Director of Clinical Pharmacy Services, Catholic Health Initiatives, Denver, CO; Clinical Associate Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Denver, Colorado
          Learning Objectives
          1. Describe opportunities and best practices in the institutional setting for cost mitigation.
          2. Identify the role of drug shortages and brand and generic pricing.
          3. Identify process management plans, communication strategies with the C-Suite and examples and algorithms to consider in mitigation.

          Patient-Focused Strategies in Ambulatory Care: Balancing Clinical and Financial
          • Speaker: Melissa S. Duke, Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS
            Senior Director, Specialty and Home Delivery Pharmacy Services, Banner Pharmacy Services, Phoenix, Arizona
          Learning Objectives
          1. Review patient focused strategies that include the topic of high cost drugs in the ambulatory.
          2. Describe governmental and pharmacy programs relevant to outpatients and provide contextual examples.
          3. Identify key high cost drugs used in ambulatory care and mitigation plans to consider.

          Pediatric PRN Focus Session -- To Inhale or Not to Inhale: Insights into Aerosolized Medications in the Pediatric Population
          October 8, 2017 4:00 PM

          Activity No. 0217-0000-17-147-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
          Application Based Activity

          • Moderator: Kalen B. Manasco, Pharm.D., BCPS, AE-C
            Clinical Professor and Division Head, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Gainesville, Florida

          Introduction to Aerosolized Medications in Pediatric Patients and Evaluation of Aerosolized Antimicrobials
          • Speaker: Hanna Phan, Pharm.D., FCCP
            Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science and Pediatrics, Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine; Associate Research Scientist, Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center - University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
          Learning Objectives
          1. Describe the age-specific processes and pharmacokinetic properties to consider when evaluating a medication for aerosolized, intranasal, and inhaled routes of administration.
          2. Analyze current literature evaluating aerosolized antimicrobials in pediatric patients, including those with cystic fibrosis.

          Evaluation of Aerosolized Medications in Pediatric Critical Care Patients
          • Speaker: Jennifer L. Morris, Pharm.D., BCPS
            Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Extracorporeal Therapies and Renal, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
          Learning Objectives
          1. Evaluate the safety and efficacy of aerosolized medications for pain and palliative care.
          2. Evaluate the safety and efficacy of aerosolized medications for pulmonary hypertension.
          3. Evaluate the safety and efficacy of aerosolized medications for plastic bronchitis.

          Pro-Con Debate on the Use of Dornase Alfa for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Indications
          • Speaker: Hanna Phan, Pharm.D., FCCP
            Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science and Pediatrics, Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine; Associate Research Scientist, Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center - University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
          Learning Objectives
          1. Debate current literature regarding the use of dornase alfa for non-cystic fibrosis indications.
          2. Develop a recommendation regarding the appropriateness of utilizing dornase alfa for non-cystic fibrosis indications.

          BCOP Clinical Sessions -- An Oncology Pharmacist's Guide to Bayesian Statistics
          October 8, 2017 4:00 PM

          Activity No. 0217-9999-17-161-L04-P; 2.00 contact hours.
          Application Based Activity

          • Faculty: Robert Beckett, Pharm.D.
            Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Director of the Drug Information Center, Manchester University, Fort Wayne, Indiana
          • Faculty: Joseph K. Jordan, Pharm.D., BCPS
            Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Drug Information Specialist - IU Health, Butler University, Indianapolis, Indiana
          Learning Objectives
          1. Compare and contrast Bayesian and frequentist statistics and how they can be used in oncology-related clincal studies.
          2. nterpret Bayesian statistics information in the methods and results of an oncology-related clinical study, including adaptive designs.
          3. Evaluate Bayesian statistics information in the methods and results of an oncology-related clinical study, including adaptive designs.

          Welcome and Overview

          Introduction to Basic Bayesian Concepts

          Published Examples of Bayesian Statistics

          Practice Exercise Workshop

          Closing and Questions

          GI/Liver/Nutrition PRN Focus Session -- Alcohol Use, Absorption After Bariatric Surgery, and IBS/IBD Updates
          October 8, 2017 4:00 PM

          Activity No. 0217-0000-17-144-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
          Knowledge Based Activity

          • Moderator: Johnathan Voss, Pharm.D.
            Surgery ICU Pharmacist, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas

          Kicking the Liver While It's Down -- Promoting Abstinence and Treating Alcohol Withdrawal in Liver Disease
          • Speaker: Jennifer Twilla, Pharm.D.
            Methodist University Hospital, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee
          Learning Objectives
          1. Discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of alcohol-induced liver failure.
          2. Appraise the evidence concerning alcohol use in patients with liver disease.
          3. Identify strategies for promoting abstinence and preventing withdrawal in patients with alcohol-induced liver disease using patient cases.

          A Growing Problem: Absorption Issues Related to Bariatric Surgery
          • Speaker: April N. Smith, Pharm.D., BCPS
            Associate Professor, Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Omaha, Nebraska
          Learning Objectives
          1. Discuss different bariatric surgery techniques and their impact on medication absorption.
          2. Identify micronutrients with altered absorption in patients with a history of bariatric surgery.
          3. Develop strategies for managing medication and micronutrient absorption issues related to bariatric surgery using example patient cases.

          Taming the Irritated and Inflamed -- Treatment Updates in IBS and IBD
          • Speaker: Gregory Zumach, Pharm.D., BCPS

            Clinical Assistant Professor, Oregon State University College of Pharmacy, Corvallis, Oregon

          Learning Objectives
          1. Discuss the most recent guidelines for irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.
          2. Identify the preferred treatment approaches to irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.
          3. Discuss the impact of nutrition on the management of irritable bowel syndrome.
          4. Compare and contrast biological agents used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and their related biosimilar agents.

          Clinical Reasoning Series in Critical Care Pharmacy-- Management of Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
          October 9, 2017 8:30 AM

          Activity No. 0217-0000-17-163-L01-P; 6.00 contact hours.
          Application Based Activity

            Learning Objectives
            1. Describe the epidemiology and pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).
            2. Discuss diagnosis, etiology and overall treatment goals in the management of patients with ARDS.
            3. Critically appraise the published literature surrounding the management of ARDS including ventilator and fluid management and use of neuromuscular blocking agents and prone positioning.
            4. Select appropriate salvage therapies including the use of corticosteroids, inhaled vasodilators, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with severe ARDS.
            5. Design treatment regimens that optimize patient outcomes.

            Introduction
            • Moderator: Amy L. Dzierba, Pharm.D., FCCM, BCPS, BCCCP
              Clinical Specialist, Critical Care Program Director, Critical Care Residency Department of Pharmacy, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York

            Overview of Epidemiology and Pathophysiology of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS)
            • Faculty: Mitchell S. Buckley, Pharm.D., FCCP, FCCM
              Clinical Pharmacy Specialist – Medical ICU, Director of PGY1 Pharmacy Residency, Banner University Medical Center Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona
            Learning Objectives
            1. Describe the incidence and mortality rates associate with ARDS.
            2. Examine the attributed causes of death in ARDS patients.
            3. Explain the pathogenesis and various phases of ARDS progression.

            Diagnosis, Etiology, and Treatment Goals of ARDS
            • Faculty: Jeffrey P. Gonzales, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP
              Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland
            Learning Objectives
            1. Compare and contrast the past and current definitions of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).
            2. Identify common etiologies of ARDS.

            Break

            Ventilator Management: Standard and Alternative Strategies
            • Faculty: Justin Muir, Pharm.D.
              Clinical Pharmacy Manager, Medical Intensive Care Unit, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
            Learning Objectives
            1. Describe usual ventilator settings in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and therapeutic and safety targets related to mechanical ventilation.
            2. Design plans for ventilator adjustments according to arterial blood gas results.
            3. Summarize alternative ventilator modes for ARDS and the potential pros and cons of each

            Therapies That Have Been Tried and Failed
            • Faculty: Jeffrey P. Gonzales, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP
              Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland
            Learning Objectives
            1. Critique acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) studies that have failed to show benefit.
            2. Identify characteristics of ARDS studies that may limit the ability to find a difference in interventions.
            3. Illustrate research methodology that influences the ability to find a difference in interventions.

            Fluid Management
            • Faculty: Jeffrey P. Gonzales, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP
              Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland
            Learning Objectives
            1. Demonstrate the importance of fluid and fluid balance in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).
            2. Critique FACTT and FACTT Lite studies.
            3. Develop an algorithm to manage fluid in patients with ARDS.

            Lunch

            Use of Prone Positioning and Neuromuscular Blocking Agents for ARDS
            • Faculty: Mitchell S. Buckley, Pharm.D., FCCP, FCCM
              Clinical Pharmacy Specialist – Medical ICU, Director of PGY1 Pharmacy Residency, Banner University Medical Center Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona
            Learning Objectives
            1. Review the proposed beneficial effects for prone position and neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).
            2. Evaluate the published clinical data for prone positioning and NMBA on outcomes in ARDS.
            3. Recommend an evidence-based strategy for prone positioning and NMBA use in ARDS.

            Break

            Salvage Therapies Employed for Severe ARDS
            • Faculty: Justin Muir, Pharm.D.
              Clinical Pharmacy Manager, Medical Intensive Care Unit, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
            Learning Objectives
            1. Demonstrate an understanding of the potential benefits and harms of inhaled pulmonary vasodilators in the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).
            2. Critique the literature on the use of corticosteroids in the management of early and late ARDS.
            3. Describe the place in therapy of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in the management of severe ARDS.
            4. Design pharmacotherapy regimens for patients receiving ECMO for ARDS.
            5. Develop a systematic approach for using salvage therapies for severe, refractory ARDS.

            Long-term Outcomes of Survivors
            • Faculty: Jeffrey P. Gonzales, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP
              Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland
            Learning Objectives
            1. Summarize long-term outcomes in ARDS survivors.
            2. Discuss ARDS and precision medicine.

            Closing Remarks
            • Faculty: Amy L. Dzierba, Pharm.D., FCCM, BCPS, BCCCP
              Clinical Specialist, Critical Care Program Director, Critical Care Residency Department of Pharmacy, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York

            Leadership Perspectives from Pharmacy Leaders: A Panel Discussion
            October 9, 2017 8:30 AM

            Activity No. 0217-0000-17-187-L04-P; 2.00 contact hours.
            Application Based Activity

            • Moderator: Robert E. Smith, Pharm.D.
              Professor Emeritus, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
            • Faculty: Jerry L. Bauman, Pharm.D., FCCP, FACC
              Dean and Distinguished Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, Rockford Campus, Rockford, Illinois
            • Faculty: Marcia L. Buck, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPPS
              Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator, Pediatrics, Department of Pharmacy; Professor of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Virginia Health System; Clinical Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy, Richmond, Virginia
            • Faculty: Hewitt W. Matthews, Ph.D., RPh
              Former Dean, Mercer University College of Pharmacy, Atlanta, Georgia
            • Faculty: Barbara J. Zarowitz, Pharm.D., FCCP, FASCP, BCPS, BCGP
              Independent Consultant, Barbara J. Zarowitz, LLC, West Bloomfield, Michigan
            Learning Objectives
            1. Apply the leadership experiences of pharmacy leaders to their own personal leadership development.
            2. Describe how your courage to create change within your organizations was strengthened by internalizing the principles for leadership success as expressed by pharmacy leaders.
            3. Write a short narrative describing how the leadership principles and pearls discussed by the four pharmacy leaders will enhance their ability to lead within their respective personal and professional lives.
            4. Describe how mentoring through listening to others enhances one’s ability to achieve.
            5. Describe examples of how ordinary people achieve extraordinary things.
            Clinical Reasoning Series in Ambulatory Care Pharmacy-- Keeping Up with Cardiology
            October 9, 2017 8:30 AM

            Activity No. 0217-0000-17-164-L01-P; 6.00 contact hours.
            Application Based Activity

              Learning Objectives
              1. Recognize the impact of heart failure on medication selection for treatment of co-morbid disease states.
              2. Critically evaluate national guidelines and current primary literature to develop patient-specific treatment plans for the management of heart failure, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidemia and hypertension.
              3. Recommend optimal treatment targets for heart failure, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidemia and hypertension in specific patient populations.
              4. Identify opportunities to optimize ambulatory care pharmacy services in cardiovascular care areas.

              Introduction
              • Moderator: Ashley Meredith (Vincent), Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, CDE
                Clinical Associate Professor, Purdue University College of Pharmacy; Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Eskenazi Health, Indianapolis, Indiana

              Heart Failure’s Role in Medication Selection
              • Faculty: Elizabeth T. Renner, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, CACP
                Clinical Pharmacist-Outpatient Cardiology at University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
              Learning Objectives
              1. Compare relevant clinical treatment algorithms for patients with comorbidities including heart failure.
              2. Recognize specific medications known to worsen heart failure.
              3. Describe the mechanisms, when known, by which medications negatively impact heart failure.

              Atrial Fibrillation: Medical Management with Anticoagulation and Beyond
              • Faculty: Elizabeth T. Renner, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, CACP
                Clinical Pharmacist-Outpatient Cardiology at University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
              Learning Objectives
              1. Estimate the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation.
              2. Estimate the magnitude of stroke risk reduction with antithrombotic therapies.
              3. Summarize the efficacy & safety data of currently available oral anticoagulants.
              4. Develop care plans for patients with barriers to oral anticoagulation.
              5. Describe the risks and benefits associated with “bridging” for atrial fibrillation patients in the peri-procedural setting.

              Break

              Dyslipidemia: Whose Side Are You On?
              • Faculty: Kirk E. Evoy, Pharm.D., BCACP, BC-ADM, CTTS
                Clinical Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin; Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio; Ambulatory Care Pharmacist, Southeast Clinic, University Health System
              Learning Objectives
              1. Compare and contrast recommendations from recent dyslipidemia management guidelines published by ACC/AHA, NLA, and AACE.
              2. Identify the role of non-statin medications in the treatment of dyslipidemia.
              3. Evaluate and manage statin-related adverse effects.
              4. Develop an appropriate treatment plan for a patient with dyslipidemia.

              Lunch

              Hypertension Targets, Medication Use, and Special Populations
              • Faculty: Jessica E. Wilhoite, Pharm.D., BCACP
                Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Butler University; Ambulatory Care Clinical Pharmacy Manager, Community Health Network
              Learning Objectives
              1. Evaluate patient risk factors and comorbidities to determine optimal blood pressure goals for the management of hypertension.
              2. Select appropriate treatment for hypertension based on national guidelines and current primary literature.
              3. Compare and contrast first line treatment options for management of hypertension.
              4. Develop patient-specific hypertension treatment plans for those with compelling indications, including diabetes, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease.

              Practice Management in Cardiology: Integrating Pharmacists into Ambulatory Care Clinics
              Learning Objectives
              1. Describe potential roles of ambulatory care pharmacists in the management of cardiology-related disease states.
              2. Anticipate potential barriers to successful integration of ambulatory care pharmacists into the care team.
              3. Develop a strategy to successfully integrate ambulatory care pharmacists into the care team.

              Break

              Panel Discussion: Q&A

              Closing Remarks
              • Moderator: Ashley Meredith (Vincent), Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, CDE
                Clinical Associate Professor, Purdue University College of Pharmacy; Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Eskenazi Health, Indianapolis, Indiana

              Survey Research: Instrument Design, Method Evaluation, and Publishing Your Work
              October 9, 2017 8:30 AM

              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-189-L04-P; 2.00 contact hours.
              Application Based Activity

              • Faculty: Sandra L. Kane-Gill, Pharm.D., M.Sc., FCCP, FCCM
                Associate Professor of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh, School of Pharmacy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
              Learning Objectives
              1. Explain the steps necessary for instrument design.
              2. Demonstrate knowledge of instrument design.
              3. Critique published survey methods.
              4. Perform steps to determine if your idea is publishable.
              5. Give your opinion about the inclusion of potential authors.
              6. Explain how to navigate through the peer-review process.
              BCOP Clinical Sessions -- Updates on New Drugs and the Management of Nausea and Vomiting
              October 9, 2017 8:30 AM

              Activity No. 0217-9999-17-162-L01-P; 2.00 contact hours.
              Application Based Activity

                New Drugs Update
                • Faculty: Amanda N. Seddon, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCOP
                  Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Hematology/Oncology/Cellular Therapy, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
                Learning Objectives
                1. Evaluate the clinical benefit of olaratumab in soft tissue sarcomas.
                2. Examine the relationship between BRCA mutations and PARP inhibitors and distinguish the therapeutic role of PARP inhibition in ovarian cancer.
                3. Examine the role of CDK 3/4 inhibition in breast cancer and the clinical benefit of ribociclib.
                4. Recommend a monitoring plan and dose adjustment to manage ribociclib toxicities.
                5. Compare the mechanism of action of PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors.
                6. Assess the clinical benefit and place in therapy for durvalumab and avelumab.
                7. Discuss the prognostic significance of FLT3 mutated AML and explain the clinical benefit seen with midostaurin in the RATIFY trial.

                Updates on the Management of Nausea and Vomiting
                • Faculty: Mary Golf, Pharm.D.
                  Pharmacy Manager, Hematology/Oncology; PGY2 Oncology Residency Program Director, Department of Pharmacy, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois
                Learning Objectives
                1. Summarize the key elements of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.
                2. Assess the current, published guidelines for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.
                3. Identify and recommend therapeutic options for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

                Bad Bugs, New Drugs -- Making Sense of Antibiotic Resistance
                October 9, 2017 9:00 AM

                Activity No. 0217-0000-17-105-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                Application Based Activity

                • Moderator: Samuel L. Aitken, Pharm.D., BCPS
                  Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

                Behind the Curtain -- Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance in MDR Gram Negatives
                • Speaker: Ryan K. Shields, Pharm.D., M.S.
                  University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
                Learning Objectives
                1. Compare and contrast clinically relevant classes of β-lactamases.
                2. Describe non β-lactamase mediated antibiotic resistance in Gram negatives.
                3. Identify emerging resistance mechanisms in MDR Gram negatives.
                4. Given a patient case, evaluate the contribution of multiple resistance mechanisms in the development of MDR Gram negatives and use this knowledge to formulate a treatment plan.

                Fresh Out of the Pipeline -- What’s New in Antibiotic Therapy for MDR Gram Negatives
                • Speaker: Jason M. Pogue, Pharm.D., BCPS
                  Clinical Pharmacist, Infectious Diseases, Sinai-Grace Hospital, Detroit, Michigan
                Learning Objectives
                1. Identify newly-approved (within the last 3 years) antibiotics for MDR Gram negatives.
                2. Compare and contrast the newly approved antimicrobials and their emerging place in therapy.
                3. Assess new literature on the use of antibiotic combination therapy and alternative routes of administration in patients with MDR Gram negatives.
                3. Describe the antibiotics in the FDA pipeline with a high likelihood of approval in the next few years and their potential clinical utility.

                Bad Bugs, New Drugs, and You -- Making Sense of the MDR World with Rapid Diagnostics
                • Speaker: Katherine K. Perez, Pharm.D., BCPS
                  Infectious Diseases Clinical Specialist, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas
                Learning Objectives
                1. Summarize available and emerging molecular and phenotypic rapid diagnostics.
                2. Apply the knowledge of mechanism and phenotype of MDR pathogens to rational drug selection in a given individual.
                3. Demonstrate how use of MDR Gram negatives rapid diagnostics can fit in daily practice to improve patient care.

                Mobile Health Technology in the Management of the Modern-Day Patient
                October 9, 2017 9:00 AM

                Activity No. 0217-0000-17-106-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                Application Based Activity

                • Moderator: J. Andrew Woods, Pharm.D., BCPS
                  Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Wingate University School of Pharmacy; Internal Medicine Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Carolinas Medical Center - Main, Charlotte, North Carolina

                Mobile Health Technology: Are We on the Cusp of More Seamless Patient Care?
                • Speaker: Kelly Grindrod, Pharm.D., M.Sc.
                  Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo School of Pharmacy, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
                Learning Objectives
                1. Describe the current landscape of mobile health technology utilization and development.
                2. Identify possible barriers for the use of mobile health applications in the healthcare setting.
                3. Assess the potential benefit of utilizing mobile health applications in the healthcare setting.

                Optimizing Patient Care: A Review of Currently Available Mobile Health Apps
                • Speaker: Scot Walker, Pharm.D., M.S., BCPS
                  CEO, Prescribe Right, LLC, St. Louis, Missouri
                Learning Objectives
                1. Discuss the most frequently utilized and reliable mobile health applications/technologies that are currently available on the market.
                2. Evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of select mobile health applications/technologies in the provision of patient care.
                3. Recommend appropriate mobile health applications/technologies for patients and fellow providers.

                A Glimpse into the Future of Mobile Health Technology
                • Speaker: Renato Cataldo, Jr., Pharm.D.
                  Founder and Chief Executive Officer, CrazyForEducation LLC and Faculty Development Solutions, St. Louis, Missouri
                Learning Objectives
                1. Discuss ongoing and planned health informatics projects utilizing mobile technologies.
                2. Analyze the implementation of ongoing and planned mobile health technologies into the practice of healthcare.
                3. Theorize how ongoing and planned mobile health technologies will alter the practice of pharmacy/medicine.

                The Newest in Natural Products and Nutraceuticals: The Era of New Resources, New Therapies, and New Practice Areas
                October 9, 2017 9:00 AM

                Activity No. 0217-0000-17-107-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                Knowledge Based Activity

                • Moderator: Kelly M. Rudd, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                  Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Anticoagulation, Bassett Healthcare Network – Bassett Medical Center, Cooperstown, New York

                Seeking the Truth: Evaluating Resources and Evidence-Based Clinical Pearls for Commonly Utilized Natural Products and Nutraceuticals
                • Speaker: Mary L. Chavez, Pharm.D.
                  Texas A&M Health Science Center, Rangel College of Pharmacy, Kingsville, Texas
                Learning Objectives
                1. Identify and evaluate quality literature and resources to guide the safe and effective use of Natural Products and Nutraceuticals in clinical practice.
                2. Discuss clinical pearls in the therapeutics of the Top 10 most commonly utilized Natural Products and Nutraceuticals.
                3. Utilize quality resource to evaluate and mitigate drug-drug and drug-disease interactions between Natural Products and Nutraceuticals and prescription medications.

                Strategies to Incorporate Natural Products and Nutraceuticals into Clinical Practice
                • Speaker: Anne L. Hume, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                  Professor of Pharmacy, University of Rhode Island; Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine, Brown University/Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island
                Learning Objectives
                1. Describe why, when and how Natural Products and Nutraceuticals may replace or be a supplement to traditional medicine.
                2. Identify ways to incorporate a shared decision making processes into the care of patients seeking to use Natural Products, Nutraceuticals or Complementary Medicine.
                3. Examine the new, evolving interdisciplinary practice area of Complementary and Integrative Medicine, and how this differs from naturopathic medicine, and the role of clinical pharmacy.

                Scientific Poster Presentation Session II: Substance Abuse/Psychiatry
                October 9, 2017 11:30 AM

                Activity No. 0217-0000-17-202-L01-P; 0.50 contact hours.
                Knowledge Based Activity

                  Learning Objectives
                  1. Discuss current and relevant research related to substance abuse and psychiatry.
                  2. Describe four substance abuse/psychiatry research studies important to clinical pharmacy.

                  Pharmacy Students’ Perception and Attitudes Toward Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Rescue Therapy
                  • Speaker: Ronnie J. Moore, Pharm.D.
                    Assistant Dean of Clinical Affairs, Touro College of Pharmacy, New York, New York

                  Characterization of Opioid Use and Adverse Outcomes Using Longitudinal Data From a Statewide Health Information Exchange
                  • Speaker: David R. Foster, Pharm.D.
                    Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University, Indianapolis, Indiana

                  Perceptions and Prevalence Surrounding Adolescent Substance Abuse: A Cross-sectional Study of the Nonmedical Use of Prescription Medications by High School Students in Nevada
                  • Speaker: Krystal KC Riccio, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDE
                    Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, Nevada

                  Diagnoses of Cardiovascular Disease or Addiction in U.S. Adults Treated for ADHD with Stimulants or Atomoxetine: Is Use Consistent with Product Labeling?
                  • Speaker: Kathleen Fairman
                    Adjunct Assistant Professor, Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy-Glendale, Glendale, Arizona

                  A Lipidomic Analysis of Skeletal Muscle in Subjects on Atypical Antipsychotics
                  • Speaker: Kyle J. Burghardt, Pharm.D.
                    Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, Michigan

                  Scientific Poster Presentation Session II: Team-Based Care
                  October 9, 2017 12:30 PM

                  Activity No. 0217-0000-17-203-L04-P; 0.50 contact hours.
                  Knowledge Based Activity

                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Discuss current and relevant team-based care research.
                    2. Describe four team-based care research studies important to clinical pharmacy.

                    Developing a Fidelity Assessment System for Comprehensive Medication Management Service
                    • Speaker: Caitlin K. Frail, Pharm.D., M.S., BCACP
                      Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota

                    Comprehensive Medication Management Within a Care Coordination Program for a Health-System Employee Group
                    • Speaker: Susan E. Conway, Pharm.D., BCPS, CACP
                      Associate Professor, OU College of Pharmacy, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

                    Closing the Loop: The Pharmacist’s Role in Deprescribing through Transitions of Care
                    • Speaker: Whitney Piper Narramore, Pharm.D.
                      PGY2 Ambulatory Care Resident, Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy, Nashville, Tennessee

                    Assessing the State of Comprehensive Medication Management in a Sample of Primary Care Clinics
                    • Speaker: Jordan Mendkoff
                      Student, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota

                    Developing a Tool to Assess the Essential Components of Practice Management for Comprehensive Medication Management Within Primary Care Clinics
                    • Speaker: Deborah Pestka, Pharm.D.
                      Ph.D. Candidate, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota

                    Nephrology PRN Focus Session -- Drug Dosing Considerations with Renal Replacement Therapy: Inpatient and Outpatient Settings
                    October 9, 2017 1:45 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-150-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Moderator: Estella M. Davis, Pharm.D., BCPS
                      Associate Professor, Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Omaha, Nebraska

                    CRRT and SLED: Inpatient Dialysis Techniques and Their Impact on Drug Dosing
                    • Speaker: Joanna Q. Hudson, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                      Professor, University of Tennessee, Departments of Clinical Pharmacy & Medicine (Nephrology), Memphis, Tennessee
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Describe factors that alter pharmacokinetic parameters in patients receiving inpatient dialysis modalities.
                    2. Compare and contrast drug dosing considerations for inpatient dialysis therapies including intermittent hemodialysis and the various continuous renal replacement therapy techniques.
                    3. Discuss research evaluating pharmacokinetic alterations of medications using hybrid renal replacement therapies including slow low efficiency dialysis.
                    4. Apply alterations of pharmacokinetic parameters of medications used in inpatient dialysis modalities to understand strategies to attain pharmacodynamic targets in acute care settings.

                    Peritoneal, Home, and Nocturnal Dialysis: Outpatient Dialysis Techniques and Their Impact on Drug Dosing
                    • Speaker: Katie E. Cardone, FCCP, FNKF, FASN, BCACP
                      Associate Professor, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, New York
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Describe factors that alter pharmacokinetic parameters in patients receiving outpatient dialysis modalities.
                    2. Compare and contrast drug dosing considerations for outpatient dialysis techniques including peritoneal dialysis, home dialysis and nocturnal dialysis.
                    3. Discuss literature and research evaluating pharmacokinetic alterations of medications using outpatient dialysis therapies.
                    4. Apply alterations of pharmacokinetic parameters of medications used in outpatient dialysis modalities to understand strategies to attain pharmacodynamic targets in these outpatient settings.

                    Research Basics
                    October 9, 2017 1:45 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-15-154-L04-P; 4.00 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Faculty: Gary L. Cochran, Pharm.D., S.M.
                      Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Pharmacy, Omaha, Nebraska
                    • Faculty: Jimmi Hatton Kolpek, Pharm.D., FCCP, FCCM, FNAP
                      Professor of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
                    • Faculty: Jacqueline McLaughlin, Ph.D., M.S.
                      Assistant Professor, Educational Innovation and Research; Director, Office of Strategic Planning and Assessment, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
                    • Faculty: Mary T. Roth McClurg, Pharm.D., MHS, FCCP
                      Associate Professor, Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education; Associate Director for Academic Innovation, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Describe common study designs used in observational, educational, health-services and experimental projects.
                    2. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the various study designs.
                    3. Discuss the optimal approach and suggested study design for your defined research question.
                    4. Identify resources needed for your research question and ideas for securing support.
                    5. Identify resources for learning how to write grants and obtain funding support in your research area.
                    6. Define the next three steps to take in creating a research funding development plan of action for your idea.
                    Personal Leadership Development
                    October 9, 2017 1:45 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-14-135-L04-P; 4.00 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Faculty: Peter Hurd, Ph.D.
                      Professor and Department Chair, Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, Missouri
                    • Faculty: Robert E. Smith, Pharm.D.
                      Professor Emeritus, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Describe the importance of taking personal responsibility for self-leadership in developing leadership capabilities.
                    2. Describe ways that you can be proactive when working with others in various settings, such as performance evaluation.
                    3. Produce the start of a personal mission statement, applying to both personal and work-related areas of your life.
                    4. Apply time management strategies, based on your mission statements, to your personal and professional leadership challenges.
                    Education and Training PRN Focus Session -- Rethinking and Evaluating Critical Thinking Activities in Residency and Experiential Education
                    October 9, 2017 1:45 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-148-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Moderator: Erica Crannage, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP
                      Associate Professor, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; Clinical Pharmacist, St. Louis University Family and Community Medicine

                    Thinking Outside the Box: How to Enhance Critical Thinking Skills in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences
                    • Speaker: Alex N. Isaacs, Pharm.D., BCPS
                      Clinical Assistant Professor, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, Indianapolis, Indiana
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Identify the need for developing critical thinking skills in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience students.
                    2. Design critical thinking activities for the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience student.
                    3. Discuss ways to implement critical thinking activities for the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience student.

                    Raise the Bar: Advancing Critical Thinking Skills in Postgraduate Residency Training
                    • Speaker: Lindsay Davis, Pharm.D., BCPS, ASH-CHC, TTS, FAzPA
                      Associate Professor, Midwestern University College of Pharmacy, Glendale, Arizona
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Identify the need for continuing to develop critical thinking skills in post-graduate trainees.
                    2. Design critical thinking activities for post-graduate trainees.
                    3. Discuss ways to implement critical thinking activities for post-graduate trainees

                    Did We Get It Right? Evaluation of Practice-Based Critical Thinking Activities
                    • Speaker: Kristin K. Janke, Ph.D.
                      Director, Wulling Center for Innovation & Scholarship in Pharmacy Education; Professor, Pharmaceutical Care & Health Systems, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Identify the importance of documenting practice-based activities through the scholarship of teaching and learning.
                    2. Review research methods in the scholarship of teaching and learning.
                    3. Generate ideas for evidence-based assessments of practice-based activities through the scholarship of teaching and learning.

                    Infectious Diseases PRN Focus Session -- Antimicrobial Dosing Dilemmas
                    October 9, 2017 1:45 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-149-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Moderator: Elias B. Chahine, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS-AQ ID
                      Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy, Palm Beach Atlantic University, West Palm Beach, Florida

                    Challenges in Dosing Antimicrobials in Obese and Morbidly Obese Patients
                    • Speaker: Jerod Nagel, Pharm.D., BCPS-AQ ID
                      Team Lead, Infectious Diseases, Director Infectious Diseases Residency, Clinical Assistant Instructor, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, Michigan
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Discuss pharmacokinetic differences in obese and morbidly obese patients.
                    2. Discuss the efficacy, safety, and cost associated with dosing antimicrobials for obese and morbidly obese patients.
                    3. Summarize the available literature for dosing vancomycin and beta-lactam antibiotics in obese and morbidly obese patients.

                    Acute Kidney Injury with Vancomycin Alone and in Combination with Beta-Lactam Antibiotics
                    • Speaker: Jason M. Pogue, Pharm.D., BCPS
                      Clinical Pharmacist, Infectious Diseases, Sinai-Grace Hospital, Detroit, Michigan
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Discuss the impact of elevated vancomycin doses and trough concentrations on the development of acute kidney injury
                    2. Explain the interaction between vancomycin and beta-lactams on the development of acute kidney injury
                    3. Compare and contrast the rate of acute kidney injury between vancomycin alone and vancomycin plus beta-lactams

                    Advantages and Disadvantages of Pharmacokinetic Dosing Using Extended- or Continuous-Infusion Antimicrobials
                    • Speaker: Marc H. Scheetz, Pharm.D., M.Sc., BCPS
                      Associate Professor, Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove, Illinois
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Illustrate the efficacy and safety associated with extended- or continuous-infusion dosing of antibiotics.
                    2. Describe the costs and institutional logistics in the successful implementation of extended- or continuous-infusion antibiotics.
                    3. Summarize the recent literature for alternate infusion dosing of beta-lactams and vancomycin.

                    Pain and Palliative Care PRN and Ambulatory Care PRN Focus Session -- The 2016 CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain – Helpful Tool or Harmful Distraction? The Debate
                    October 9, 2017 3:30 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-151-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Moderator: Jennifer Pruskowski, Pharm.D., BCPS, CGP
                      Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics; Palliative Care Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, UPMC Palliative and Supportive Institute (PSI), UPMC Palliative and Supportive Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

                    Introducing the 2016 CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain
                    • Speaker: Timothy J. Atkinson, Pharm.D.
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Describe the opioid epidemic and the need for the 2016 CDC Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids.
                    2. Introduce the 2016 CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain document.
                    3. Identify eligible patients for the 2016 CDC Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain document.

                    Helpful Tool or Harmful Distraction? The Debate: The Helpful Tool Side
                    • Speaker: Laura A. Morgan, Pharm.D., MEd, BCPS
                      Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Education, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy, Richmond, Virginia
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Describe the available evidence to support the guidelines/recommendations.
                    2. Discuss the utility of the recommendations in patient care.
                    3. Consider other evidence based practices to ensure the balance between rational access to, and safety of, opioid prescribing.

                    Helpful Tool or Harmful Distraction? The Debate: The Harmful Distraction Side
                    • Speaker: Abigail Brooks, Pharm.D., BCPS

                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Identify conflicting evidence for the guidelines/recommendations.
                    2. Discuss barriers to implementation of the guidelines/recommendations into patient care.
                    3. Describe other evidence based practices to ensure the balance between rational access to, and safety of, opioid prescribing.

                    Applying the 2016 CDC Guidelines to a Patient Case
                    • Speaker: Timothy J. Atkinson, Pharm.D.
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Review the 2016 CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain document
                    2. Apply information to a patient case.

                    Pharmaceutical Industry PRN Focus Session -- Pharmacy Olympics: How to Earn the Gold Medal for the Hurdles of Medication Costs
                    October 9, 2017 3:30 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-152-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Moderator: Carmelina Staino, Pharm.D.
                      ‎Medical Science Liaison, Veloxis Pharmaceuticals

                    The 100-Meter Event: Maximizing Insurance and Discount Programs
                    • Speaker: Lisa Potter, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                      Clinical Coordinator, Transplant Pharmacy Services, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Describe the current landscape of prescription insurance coverage in the United States.
                    2. Describe how the prohibitive nature of medication costs can affect medication adherence.
                    3. Optimize a patient’s medication coverage on their private or government prescription insurance plan.
                    4. Utilize discount prescription drug programs (i.e. GoodRx, $4 drug plan).
                    5. Navigate disease-specific foundations and grants for prescription support.

                    The 400-Meter Event: Accessing Industry Support
                    • Speaker: Patricia W. Slattum, Pharm.D., Ph.D.
                      Victor A. Yanchick Professor; Director, Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Program, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Demonstrate how to find industry sponsored prescription support.
                    2. Differentiate patient assistance programs and co-pay assistance programs.
                    3. Assess patient eligibility for industry-funded support.
                    4. Describe what compassionate use programs are and how patient's can be enrolled in compassionate use programs or clinical trials.

                    Women’s Health PRN Focus Session -- Pharmacist Prescriptive Authority: Updates in Our Nation and in Women’s Health
                    October 9, 2017 3:30 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-153-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Moderator: Kathleen Vest, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDE
                      Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove, Illinois

                    An Overview of Pharmacist Prescriptive Authority in the United States
                    • Speaker: Donald Downing, B.S.
                      Clinical Professor, University of Washington School of Pharmacy Endowed Chair: Institute for Innovative Pharmacy Practice, Seattle, Washington
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Discuss the status of pharmacist prescribing authority in the United States, including contraception and other medications.
                    2. Review terms used when describing pharmacy practice expansion (e.g. provision and prescribing).
                    3. Discuss the barriers and successes to legislation granting pharmacist prescribing.
                    4. Identify the resources available to advocate in the current status or development of a pharmacist prescribing protocol.

                    Application of a Contraceptive Protocol in Clinical Practice
                    • Speaker: Sally Rafie, Pharm.D., BCPS, NCMP
                      Pharmacist Specialist, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Review the data supporting pharmacist provision of hormonal contraception, including safety and feasibility.
                    2. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of elements in a pharmacist contraceptive prescribing protocol.
                    3. Utilize resources which facilitate selection of a contraceptive method for a specific patient based on both contraceptive and non-contraceptive effects.
                    4. Given a complex patient case, utilize a contraceptive protocol to provide reproductive care for the patient.

                    Enhancing Student Learning and Engagement Through an Interactive Presentation and Assessment Tool
                    October 9, 2017 3:30 PM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-190-L04-P; 2.00 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                    • Faculty: Marsha McFalls, Pharm.D., MSEd, RPh
                      Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Duquesne University Mylan School of Pharmacy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
                    Learning Objectives
                    1. Identify the uses of an interactive presentation.
                    2. Identify strategies to use an interactive presentation and assessment tool to promote active learning.
                    3. Identify strategies to use an interactive presentation and assessment tool to promote ability development.
                    4. Identify strategies to use an interactive presentation and assessment tool to assess and evaluate student learning.
                    Scientific Poster Presentation Session III: Education & Training
                    October 10, 2017 8:00 AM

                    Activity No. 0217-0000-17-205-L04-P; 0.50 contact hours.
                    Knowledge Based Activity

                      Learning Objectives
                      1. Discuss current and relevant pharmacy education and training research.
                      2. Describe four pharmacy education and training studies important to enhancing the profession.

                      Measuring Students’ Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes of the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process in an Interprofessional Setting
                      • Speaker: Kimberly Elder, Pharm.D., BCPS
                        Assistant Professor, Sullivan University College of Pharmacy,Louisville, Kentucky

                      Utility of Clinical Skills Evaluation During PGY1 Interviews
                      • Speaker: Jennifer L. Austin, Pharm.D., BCPS
                        Residency Program Director, PGY1 Pharmacy Residency, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

                      Perspectives of New Practitioners Concerning Post-Graduate Residency Application Experiences
                      • Speaker: Jonathan C. Cho, Pharm.D., BCPS
                        Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, Texas

                      Peer Assessment of SOAP Note Writing with Calibrated Peer Review
                      • Speaker: Michelle A. Fravel, Pharm.D., BCPS
                        Clinical Assistant Professor and Clinical Pharmacy Specialist; Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science and Department of Pharmaceutical Care; University of Iowa College of Pharmacy and University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics; Iowa City, Iowa

                      Clinical Reasoning Series in Pediatric Pharmacy-- Pediatric Asthma: Beyond the Guidelines
                      October 10, 2017 8:30 AM

                      Activity No. 0217-0000-17-165-L01-P; 6.00 contact hours.
                      Application Based Activity

                        Learning Objectives
                        1. Design an individualized, evidence-based therapeutic plan for managing a pediatric asthma patient who has not responded to asthma guideline recommended therapy.
                        2. Identify and critically evaluate pharmacologic treatment options for the pediatric status asthmaticus patient who has failed standard treatment.
                        3. Discuss pharmacogenomic variants that can impact patient response to asthma medications.
                        4. Evaluate published literature to support the use of alternative pharmacotherapy options for the treatment of pediatric asthma patients.
                        5. Compare and contrast different medication adherence strategies for pediatric asthma patients.

                        Introduction
                        • Moderator: Rebecca S. Pettit, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, BCPPS
                          Pediatric Pulmonary Clinical Specialist, Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana

                        Overview of Pathophysiology and Monitoring of the Difficult-to-Control Pediatric Patient with Asthma
                        • Faculty: Elizabeth Autry, Pharm.D., BCPPS
                          Pediatric Clinical Pharmacist, University of Kentucky HealthCare; Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy
                        Learning Objectives
                        1. Describe the epidemiologic features of asthma in pediatric patients.
                        2. Assess characteristics of severe asthma patients.
                        3. Explain the phenotypic findings in severe asthma.
                        4. Construct monitoring strategies in pediatric patients with difficult to control asthma.

                        Alternative Treatment Strategies for the Pediatric Patient with Asthma
                        • Faculty: Erin J. McDade, Pharm.D., BCPPS
                          Clinical Pharmacy Specialist-Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas
                        Learning Objectives
                        1. Discuss available alternative treatment options.
                        2. Review evidence supporting the use of alternative treatment options.
                        3. Design an individualized, evidence-based therapeutic plan for managing a pediatric asthma patient who has not responded to asthma guideline recommended therapy.

                        Pharmacogenomic Variants in Asthma
                        • Faculty: Jean Y. Moon, Pharm.D., BCACP
                          Associate Professor, North Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
                        Learning Objectives
                        1. Identify pharmacogenomic variants that can impact patient response to asthma medications
                        2. Describe common asthma phenotypes and the corresponding treatment implications
                        3. Explain current guidance on pharmacogenomics testing for patients with asthma.

                        Break

                        Applying Alternative Treatments to the Difficult-to-Treat Patient
                        Learning Objectives
                        1. Given a patient case, determine the best alternative treatment option for a pediatric patient with difficult to control asthma
                        2. Identify and critically evaluate pharmacologic treatment options for the pediatric asthma patient who has failed standard treatment

                        Lunch

                        Status Asthmaticus -- Beyond Basic Treatment/Patient Case Discussion
                        • Faculty: Susan Warrington, Pharm.D., BCPPS
                          Residency Preceptor with the Pharmacy Residency Program and Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Critical Care, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
                        Learning Objectives
                        1. Identify and critically evaluate pharmacologic treatment options for the pediatric asthma patient who has failed standard treatment.
                        2. Given a patient case, develop a therapeutic plan to manage refractory status asthmaticus.
                        3. Summarize the pros and cons of “beyond basic” therapies for refractory status asthmaticus.

                        Break

                        Adherence Strategies for Pediatric Patients with Asthma
                        • Faculty: Elizabeth Autry, Pharm.D., BCPPS
                          Pediatric Clinical Pharmacist, University of Kentucky HealthCare; Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy
                        Learning Objectives
                        1. Review the evidence on adherence rates in pediatric asthma.
                        2. Discuss adherence barriers in asthma.
                        3. Summarize techniques employed to improve adherence in pediatric asthma.
                        4. Assess a patient case to identify adherence barriers.
                        5. Choses a plan to promote improved medication adherence in a patient case.

                        Use of Technology to Assist in Pediatric Asthma Management
                        • Faculty: Jean Y. Moon, Pharm.D., BCACP
                          Associate Professor, North Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
                        Learning Objectives
                        1. Identify types of assistive technology available to patients, caregivers, and health professionals.
                        2. Review current available evidence for various health information technologies.
                        3. Summarize the pros and cons of the various health information technologies reviewed,

                        Closing Remarks
                        • Moderator: Rebecca S. Pettit, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, BCPPS
                          Pediatric Pulmonary Clinical Specialist, Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana

                        Clinical Reasoning Series in Pharmacotherapy-- Gut Check Time: An Update in Gastrointestinal Pharmacotherapeutics
                        October 10, 2017 8:30 AM

                        Activity No. 0217-0000-17-207-L01-P; 6.00 contact hours.
                        Application Based Activity

                          Learning Objectives
                          1. Determine the best therapeutic option(s) in managing patients with liver disease, pancreatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, opioid-induced constipation, or bariatric surgery.
                          2. Discuss emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options in the management of liver disease, pancreatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, opioid-induced constipation, or bariatric surgery.
                          3. Manage the treatment and processes in transitions of care in patients with liver disease, pancreatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, opioid-induced constipation, or bariatric surgery.
                          4. Design an appropriate monitoring plan for patients with liver disease, pancreatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, opioid-induced constipation, or bariatric surgery.
                          5. Apply clinical and pharmacoeconomic data to individual patient care and formulary decisions regarding drugs used for liver disease, pancreatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, opioid-induced constipation, or bariatric surgery

                          Introduction
                          • Moderator: Jeffrey T. Sherer, Pharm.D., MPH, BCPS, BCGP
                            Clinical Associate Professor, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, Texas

                          Inflammatory Bowel Disease
                          • Faculty: Bryan L. Love, Pharm.D., BCPS
                            Associate Professor, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina
                          Learning Objectives
                          1. Interpret emerging diagnostic options in the management of inflammatory bowel disease.
                          2. Compare therapeutic option(s) in managing patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
                          3. Analyze medical literature and apply common statistical applications to IBD.
                          4. Design an appropriate monitoring plan for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

                          Updates to the Management of Pain in Chronic Pancreatitis
                          • Faculty: Bernadette Asias-Dinh, Pharm.D., BCACP, BCPS, CDE
                            Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Translational Research, Texas Medical Center Campus, University of Houston, Houston, Texas
                          Learning Objectives
                          1. Compare therapeutic agents that have been studied in the management of pain in chronic pancreatitis.
                          2. Formulate optimal treatment regimens in the management of pain in chronic pancreatitis.
                          3. Differentiate between “early invasive” and “step-up” therapy approaches to management of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

                          Break

                          Bariatric Surgery
                          • Faculty: Amaris Fuentes, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP
                            Clinical Specialist in Critical Care, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas
                          Learning Objectives
                          1. Analyze the role of bariatric surgery in the management of patients with morbid obesity.
                          2. Examine the complications and medication related changes evident post-bariatric surgery.
                          3. Evaluate the role of a pharmacist in the care of patients undergoing bariatric surgery procedures.

                          Lunch

                          Chronic Liver Disease
                          • Faculty: Rima A. Mohammad, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                            Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, Michigan
                          Learning Objectives
                          1. Outline the current guideline recommendations for the management of complications associated with chronic liver disease (CLD), which include hepatic encephalopathy (HE), ascites, and portal hypertension.
                          2. Review results from clinical studies to the management of complications associated with CLD.
                          3. Design evidence-based treatment and prevention regimens in patients with complications associated with CLD.
                          4. Discuss complications associated with ascites (spontaneous bacterial peritonitis [SBP] and hepatorenal syndrome [HRS]) and portal hypertension (varices and variceal bleeding).
                          5. Assess and apply information on transitions of care and treatment cost in the management of patients with complications associated with CLD.

                          Opioid-Induced Constipation
                          • Faculty: Rima A. Mohammad, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                            Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, Michigan
                          Learning Objectives
                          1. Evaluate clinical studies and guidelines on the management of opioid-induced constipation (OIC).
                          2. Design evidence-based treatment and prevention regimen in patients with OIC.
                          3. Assess and apply information on transitions of care and treatment cost in the management of patients with OIC.

                          Break

                          Irritable Bowel Syndrome
                          • Faculty: Bryan L. Love, Pharm.D., BCPS
                            Associate Professor, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, South Carolina
                          Learning Objectives
                          1. Assess symptoms of IBS including the most common clinical presentations.
                          2. Recognize warning signs that require further evaluation prior to initiating IBS therapy.
                          3. Compare the safety and efficacy of eluxadoline, lubiprostone, and linaclotide for the treatment of IBS.
                          4. Develop a pharmacotherapy regimen for a given patient case.

                          Closing Remarks
                          • Moderator: Jeffrey T. Sherer, Pharm.D., MPH, BCPS, BCGP
                            Clinical Associate Professor, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, Texas

                          Scientific Poster Presentation Session III: Pulmonary
                          October 10, 2017 9:00 AM

                          Activity No. 0217-0000-17-204-L04-P; 0.50 contact hours.
                          Knowledge Based Activity

                            Learning Objectives
                            1. Discuss current and relevant pulmonary research.
                            2. Describe four pulmonary focused studies important to clinical pharmacy.

                            Evaluation of Long-Acting Bronchodilator Use During Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations in an Academic Medical Center
                            • Speaker: Julie A. Murphy, Pharm.D., FCCP, FASHP, BCPS
                              Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio

                            Triple vs. Dual Therapy in COPD: A Meta-Analysis
                            • Speaker: Melissa Lipari, Pharm.D., BCACP
                              Clinical Assistant Professor, WSU Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, Michigan

                            Triple Versus Monotherapy in COPD: A Meta-Analysis
                            • Speaker: Melissa Lipari, Pharm.D., BCACP
                              Clinical Assistant Professor, WSU Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Detroit, Michigan

                            External Validation of Three Risk-Stratification Rules in Patients with Pulmonary Embolism and Cancer
                            • Speaker: Erin Weeda, Pharm.D., BCPS
                              Assistant Professor, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Columbia, South Carolina

                            Integration of Transitions of Care Pharmacist Services Within an Accredited Pulmonary Rehabilitation Clinic
                            • Speaker: Paul M. Boylan, Pharm.D., BCPS
                              Assistant Professor, Larkin University, Miami/Fort Lauderdale, Florida

                            Mitigating Acute Kidney Injury Risk: Vancomycin + ?
                            October 10, 2017 10:15 AM

                            Activity No. 0217-0000-17-198-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                            Knowledge Based Activity

                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Discuss the general risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in non-critically ill patients treated with vancomycin plus broad spectrum beta lactams.
                              2. Describe when critically ill children should be evaluated for the continued need of broad spectrum antibiotic coverage in order to decrease the risk of AKI.
                              3. Evaluate the risk of AKI in critically ill adults treated with combination therapy, including vancomycin plus broad spectrum beta lactams.
                              4. Recognize how continuous versus intermittent infusions of vancomycin impacts the risk of AKI in critically ill patients.
                              5. Describe how to decrease the potential risk of AKI in critically ill adults.

                              Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Concomitant Vancomycin and Piperacillin/Tazobactam Compared with Vancomycin and Cefepime
                              • Speaker: Kyle C. Molina
                                Pharm.D. Candidate 2018, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy-Glendale, Glendale, Arizona

                              Increased Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children Treated with Vancomycin and Piperacillin/Tazobactam
                              • Speaker: Maya R. Holsen, Pharm.D.
                                PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Resident, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio

                              Continuous vs. Intermittent Infusion of Vancomycin and the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
                              • Speaker: Alexander H. Flannery, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP
                                Critical Care Pharmacist, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Kentucky HealthCare, Lexington, Kentucky

                              Incidence of Acute Kidney Injury Among Patients Receiving the Combination of Vancomycin with Piperacillin/Tazobactam or Meropenem
                              • Speaker: Amy Robertson, Pharm.D.
                                Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Kansas School of Pharmacy, Wichita Campus, Wichita, Kansas

                              Fundamentals of Providing Excellent Manuscript Peer Reviews
                              October 10, 2017 10:15 AM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-196-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: James E. Tisdale, Pharm.D., FCCP, FAPhA, FNAP, FAHA, BCPS
                                Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Purdue University, and Adjunct Professor, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana
                              • Speaker: Stuart T. Haines, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, BC-ADM
                                Professor and Director, Division of Pharmacy Professional Development, University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, Jackson, Mississippi
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Explain why peer review is critical to ensuring the quality of science and its translation to practice.
                              2. Construct a peer review report that is logically organized and addresses the critical issues per the journal instructions.
                              3. Provide appropriate feedback to the editor(s) about the acceptability of the manuscript for publication and to the author(s) that improve manuscript quality.
                              4. Determine when one should decline to review a manuscript.
                              Clinical Pharmacy Practice Model: Discussion and Debate
                              October 10, 2017 10:15 AM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-100-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Mitchell S. Buckley, Pharm.D., FCCP, FCCM
                                Clinical Pharmacy Specialist – Medical ICU, Director of PGY1 Pharmacy Residency, Banner University Medical Center Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona

                              Changes and Challenges in the Clinical Pharmacy Landscape
                              • Speaker: William A. Miller, Pharm.D., FCCP, FASHP
                                Professor Emeritus of Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Review the historical perspective on the evolution of the clinical pharmacy specialist practice model.
                              2. Describe the Practice Advancement Initiative (PAI) and the potential impact on adaptation by health-systems.
                              3. Discuss the changes and challenges facing clinical pharmacy practice advancement.

                              Pro: The Ideal Clinical Pharmacy Model Is the Practice Advancement Initiative
                              • Speaker: George A. Davis, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Anticoagulation Program Coordinator, University of Kentucky UK HealthCare, Lexington, Kentucky
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. List the advantages of the Practice Advancement Initiative (PAI) model.
                              2. Identify the challenges and barriers with transitioning to the PAI model.
                              3. Explain the PAI model’s impact on teaching, scholarship, and research.

                              Con: The Ideal Clinical Pharmacy Model Is NOT the Practice Advancement Initiative
                              • Speaker: Curtis E. Haas, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                                Director of Pharmacy, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe the advantages of the clinical pharmacy specialist model.
                              2. Identify the challenges and barriers of the PAI model compared to the clinical pharmacy specialist model.
                              3. Discuss the negative impact and disadvantages of the PAI compared to the clinical pharmacy specialist model.

                              Cracking the Code on Oral Chemotherapy: Updates for Every Pharmacist
                              October 10, 2017 10:15 AM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-108-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Marco Martino, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, BCOP
                                Operations Team Lead (Hematology/Oncology), Northwestern Medicine, Chicago, Illinois

                              Cracking the Code on Oral Chemotherapy: Introduction and Practical Considerations
                              • Speaker: Christy S. Harris, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCOP
                                Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy-Boston, MCPHS University, Boston, Massachusetts
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Explain the progression of oral chemotherapy agents throughout the history of the United States Healthcare system.
                              2. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of oral chemotherapy versus parenteral chemotherapy.
                              3. Discuss the financial concerns surrounding oral chemotherapy, and recent legislation that has been passed to alleviate these concerns.

                              Cracking the Code on Oral Chemotherapy: Pharmacotherapy Management and Counseling Strategies
                              • Speaker: David L. DeRemer, Pharm.D., BCOP
                                Clinical Associate Professor, Assistant Director of Clinical Therapeutics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. List the most commonly dispensed medication classes of oral chemotherapeutic agents.
                              2. Explain the pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacokinetics for the most commonly dispensed oral chemotherapeutic agents.
                              3. Identify the main counseling points for the most commonly dispensed oral chemotherapeutic agents.

                              Medication Management for Chronic Illness Survivorship
                              October 10, 2017 10:15 AM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-154-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Linda M. Sobeski, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

                              Medication Management for Pediatric Cancer Survivorship
                              • Speaker: John N. McCormick, Pharm.D., BCNSP
                                Director, Clinical Pharmacy Services, St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe the complications commonly seen with pediatric cancer survivorship.
                              2. Explain the medication management for the complications commonly seen with pediatric cancer survivorship.
                              3. Discuss common adverse effects of medications used to treat complications commonly seen with pediatric cancers.

                              Medication Management for Solid Organ Transplant Survivorship
                              • Speaker: Christopher R. Ensor, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Medicine; Medical Director of Lung Transplant Outcomes Research Program, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe the complications commonly seen with solid organ transplantation survivorship.
                              2. Explain the medication management for the complications commonly seen with solid organ transplantation survivorship.
                              3. Discuss common adverse effects of medications used to treat complications commonly seen with solid organ transplantation survivorship.

                              Medication Management for HIV Survivorship
                              • Speaker: Kimberly Scarsi, Pharm.D., M.Sc.
                                Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Pharmacy, Omaha, Nebraska
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe the complications commonly seen with HIV survivorship.
                              2. Explain the medication management for the complications commonly seen with HIV survivorship.
                              3. 3) Discuss common adverse effects of medications used to treat complications commonly seen with HIV survivorship.

                              When Guidelines Don’t Guide: Managing Common Inpatient Disease States Lacking Practice Guidelines
                              October 10, 2017 10:15 AM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-155-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Kristina M. Thurber, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Internal Medicine Clinical Pharmacist, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota

                              Treatment Gaps in the Management of Bacterial Bloodstream Infections and Urinary Tract Infections in Hospitalized Patients
                              • Speaker: Lisa M. Avery, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Wegmans School of Pharmacy, St. John Fisher College, Rochester, New York; Infectious Disease Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center, Syracuse, New York
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Outline current gaps in clinical practice guidelines related to bacterial bloodstream infections and urinary tract infections in infection sub-types which are not discussed in traditional guidelines.
                              2. Discuss the available literature in the treatment of bacterial bloodstream infections and urinary tract infections, and the applications to patient care.
                              3. Select of optimal treatment regimens, duration, potential adverse effects and utility of oral antibiotics in bacterial bloodstream infections and urinary tract infections based on available evidence.
                              4. Apply learned concepts to a patient case.

                              Treatment Gaps in the Management of Alcohol Withdrawal and Agitation/Delirium in Non-Critically Ill Hospitalized Patients
                              • Speaker: Jonathan G. Leung, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCPP
                                Mayo Clinic Hospital – Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Outline current gaps in clinical practice guidelines related to alcohol withdrawal and agitation/delirium in non-critically ill patients.
                              2. Discuss the available literature in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal and agitation/delirium in non-critically ill patients.
                              3. Discuss selection of optimal treatment regimens and potential adverse effects for management of alcohol withdrawal and agitation/delirium based on available evidence.
                              4. Apply learned concepts to a patient case.

                              Planning for Effective Teaching
                              October 10, 2017 1:15 PM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-14-136-L04-P; 4.00 contact hours.
                              Application Based Activity

                              • Faculty: Brenda L. Gleason, Pharm.D.
                                Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Professor of Pharmacy Practice, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, Missouri
                              • Faculty: Daniel S. Longyhore, Pharm.D., M.S., BCACP
                                Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; Ambulatory Care Pharmacist, St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
                              • Faculty: Thomas D. Zlatic, Ph.D.
                                Professor, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, Missouri
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Explain the purposes and strategies for planning a course or clinical experience.
                              2. Create learning outcomes for didactic and clinical settings.
                              3. Construct teaching strategies for targeted students so that they can achieve the learning outcomes.
                              4. Devise strategies to create a learning environment conducive to the achievement of learning outcomes.
                              Drug Information PRN Focus Session -- How to Find, Evaluate, and Communicate Evidence-Based Recommendations
                              October 10, 2017 1:15 PM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-156-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Janine S. Douglas, Pharm.D., BCPS

                              Building and Refining an Advanced Literature Search
                              • Speaker: Ryan Rodriguez, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Clinical Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Design an effective and efficient literature search using advanced techniques in reliable secondary resources.
                              2. Develop and refine search criteria to obtain pertinent high level evidence.
                              3. Apply selected literature (eg, outcomes or populations) for inclusion in a meta-analysis or systematic review.

                              Applying and Communicating Evidence in Clinical Decisions
                              • Speaker: Miki A. Goldwire, Pharm.D., M.S., B.S., BCPS
                                Regis University School of Pharmacy, Denver, Colorado
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe when to use what evidence: results from experimental studies, observational studies, clinical practice guidelines, and expert opinion.
                              2. State key steps in critically appraising the evidence during the clinical decision making process based on type of evidence that best answers the question asked.
                              3. Apply and communicate evidence findings using objective data from critically appraising the evidence.
                              4. State advantages and disadvantages to using evidence-based strategies in making formulary and patient care decisions.

                              Geriatrics PRN Focus Session -- Demystifying Deprescribing
                              October 10, 2017 1:15 PM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-157-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Emily P. Peron, Pharm.D., M.S.

                              Clinical Considerations in Deprescribing
                              • Speaker: Kristin Zimmerman, Pharm.D., CGP
                                Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science, VCU School of Pharmacy, Richmond, Virginia
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe best practices in deprescribing across the continuum of care (e.g., inpatient, outpatient, long-term care settings) .
                              2. Describe how to implement existing algorithms and models for practice.
                              3. Apply pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles to a patient case requiring a plan for deprescribing.

                              Overcoming Obstacles to Deprescribing
                              • Speaker: Dawn Kashelle Lockman, Pharm.D., M.A.

                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Identify how to develop strategies for obtaining prescriber and patient buy-in.
                              2. Discuss ethical considerations of deprescribing.

                              Health Outcomes PRN Focus Session -- Design and Implementation of Health Outcomes Research Using Electronic Medical Records
                              October 10, 2017 1:15 PM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-158-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Diana M. Sobieraj, Pharm.D.
                                Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Hartford, Connecticut

                              Introduction
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Explain the purpose and structure of the ACCP PBRN.
                              2. Compare and contrast research questions that are an appropriate fit for conduct within the ACCP PBRN.

                              Pearls for the Design and Implementation of EMR-Based Health Outcomes Research
                              • Speaker: Alan J. Zillich, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCACP
                                Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, Indianapolis, Indiana; Research Scientist, Roudebush VA Medical Center, Center for Health Information and Communication
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe Federal funding mechanisms available for pharmacists-scientists planning practice-based research projects and the process of securing Federal funding for research.
                              2. Describe the nuances pertaining to completing Federally-funded studies within the ACCP PBRN.

                              Lessons Learned -- Pharmacy Residency-Focused Research
                              • Speaker: Michael Nailor, Pharm.D.
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe pharmaceutical industry funding mechanisms available for pharmacists-scientists planning practice-based research projects and the process of securing pharmaceutical industry funding for research.
                              2. Describe the nuances pertaining to completing pharmaceutical industry-funded studies within the ACCP PBRN.

                              Lessons Learned -- National Closed-System Research
                              • Speaker: Christopher R. Frei, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                                Associate Professor, Pharmacotherapy Division, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin; and Adjunct Faculty Member, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Pharmacotherapy Education & Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe other (e.g., Foundation, academia) funding mechanisms available for pharmacists-scientists planning practice-based research projects and the process of securing other types of funding for research.
                              2. Describe the nuances pertaining to completing studies funded by other sources within the ACCP PBRN.

                              Lessons Learned -- PBRN-Focused Research
                              • Speaker: Christopher M. Bland, Pharm.D., FIDSA, BCPS
                                Clinical Associate Professor, University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, Southeast Georgia Campus, Savannah, Georgia
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Compare and contrast ways in which federal, industry, and foundation funding influences the completion of research studies within the ACCP PBRN.
                              2. Compare and contrast ways in which federal, industry, and foundation funding influences the completion of research studies within the ACCP PBRN.

                              Panel Discussion
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Describe the role of the ACCP PBRN Community Advisory Panel.
                              2. Describe the 2016-2017 charge for the ACCP PBRN Advisory Panel and provide an update.

                              Cardiology PRN Focus Session -- Practical Approaches to Heart Failure Management Across the Continuum of Care
                              October 10, 2017 1:15 PM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-159-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Robert J. DiDomenico, Jr., Pharm.D.
                                Clinical Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

                              Rise of the Machines: Medication Optimization in Patients with Implantable Devices for Heart Failure
                              • Speaker: Brent N. Reed, Pharm.D., FAHA, BCPS-AQ Cardiology
                                Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy; Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Customize pharmacotherapy in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) using data derived from a CardioMEMS® device.
                              2. Identify best practices for achieving optimal anticoagulation of a patient with HF on an Impella® device.
                              3. Optimize guideline-directed medications to achieve short- and long- term hemodynamic stability in patients treated with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

                              Easing the Transition from Hospital to Home: Empowering Clinical Pharmacists to Improve Heart Failure Outcomes
                              • Speaker: Tracy E. Macaulay, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Clinical Pharmacist Specialist, Cardiology, Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Determine effective strategies for transitioning patients from inpatient to outpatient care to improve heart failure (HF) outcomes.
                              2. Identify opportunities for pharmacists in interdisciplinary clinics to prevent readmissions following recent HF hospitalization.
                              3. Apply best practices for patient education to improve care transitions.

                              The “Other” Transition: Pharmacists’ Role in Palliative Care for End-Stage Heart Failure
                              • Speaker: Kasey L. Malotte, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Advanced Practice Pharmacist, Supportive Care Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Reassess pharmacotherapeutic goals for patients with advanced heart failure (HF) transitioning to palliative care.
                              2. Customize pharmacotherapy to optimize comfort and quality of life in endstage HF.
                              3. Determine when to de-escalate therapy in patients with end-stage HF.

                              Late-Breaking Literature and Recent Developments in Clinical Pharmacy
                              October 10, 2017 3:00 PM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-160-L01-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Marco Martino, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, BCOP
                                Operations Team Lead (Hematology/Oncology), Northwestern Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Identify new and emerging clinical data and/or patient care trends that affect current/future pharmacotherapy and/or health care outcomes.
                              2. Describe limitations and/or controversies associated with these late-breaking data.
                              3. Discuss the implications of late-breaking data and/ emerging patient care trends on current clinical practice.

                              Washington Leadership Changes to Health Care/Heath Care Reform: Clinical Pharmacy Friend or Foe
                              • Speaker: Paul T. Kelly
                                Federal Group, Inc., Washington, D.C.

                              Critical Care/Neurology
                              • Speaker: Drayton A. Hammond, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, BCCCP
                                Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Medical and Cardiac Intensive Care, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois

                              Emergency Medicine
                              • Speaker: Craig Cocchio, Pharm.D., BCPS
                                Emergency Medicine Clinical Pharmacist, Trinity Mother Frances Hospital, Tyler, Texas

                              Gi/Liver/Nutrition
                              • Speaker: Jennifer Twilla, Pharm.D.
                                Methodist University Hospital, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee

                              Women's Health
                              • Speaker: Sarah Lynch, Pharm.D.
                                Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Skills Education, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York

                              Redefining Clinical Pharmacist Role with Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement (QAPI) Programs
                              October 10, 2017 3:00 PM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-103-L04-P; 1.50 contact hours.
                              Knowledge Based Activity

                              • Moderator: Dustin D. Spencer, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS
                                Clinical Director, Cardiopulmonary Diseases, Innovative Delivery Solutions, Cardinal Health, Houston, Texas

                              The QAPI Process and the Clinical Pharmacist's Role
                              • Speaker: Tiffany E. Kaiser, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                                Associate Professor of Medicine, Assistant Director of the PGY2 Transplant Specialty Residency, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Discuss QAPI elements and processes.
                              2. Define role of regulatory agencies in QAPI.
                              3. Describe what makes an effective QAPI program.

                              Pharmacist's Role in Optimizing Health Outcomes by Leading Clinical Quality Improvement Projects (inpatient example)
                              • Speaker: Jannet M. Carmichael, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
                                VA Sierra Pacific Network, Reno, Nevada
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Discuss the evolution of inpatient pharmacist role with QAPI.
                              2. Analyze or Rank elements required for a successful PharmD involvement with QAPI.
                              3. Identify challenges for implementing a QAPI program/project.

                              Pharmacist's Role in Optimizing Health Outcomes by Leading Clinical Quality Improvement Projects (outpatient example)
                              • Speaker: Carla Bouwmeester, Pharm.D., M.S., FASCP, BCPS, BCGP
                                Associate Clinical Professor, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Discuss the evolution of outpatient pharmacist role with QAPI.
                              2. Analyze or Rank elements required for a successful PharmD involvement with QAPI.
                              3. Identify challenges for implementing a QAPI program/project.

                              Getting Things Done in Organizations
                              October 10, 2017 3:30 PM

                              Activity No. 0217-0000-17-188-L04-P; 2.00 contact hours.
                              Application Based Activity

                              • Faculty: Robert E. Smith, Pharm.D.
                                Professor Emeritus, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
                              Learning Objectives
                              1. Demonstrate a greater understanding of the essential principles and practices necessary to succeed in volunteer, educational and business related organizations.
                              2. Discuss the elements of successful teams.
                              3. Relate the importance of demonstrating humility and controlling ego.
                              4. Lead a principle-based, accountability-laden successful team meeting.
                              5. Describe the importance of accountability as a principle for success within organizations.
                              6. Conduct a warm-up team building exercise.
                              7. Apply the learned leadership principles to his/her roles within ACCP and back home.